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roofer in Seabrook Island, SC

Have you ever taken a second to really think about how important your home's roof is to your health and safety? It's so much more than a simple hat for your house. It protects you from the elements like rain, sleet, snow, and wind. It helps keep you and your family warm in the winter and cool in the summer. Those harmful pests and critters you see roaming around your property? Your roof helps keep them away from your family, too.

When you take those points into account, it becomes clear that your home's roof is crucial for year-round well-being and comfort. So, when your roof is nearing the end of its life, or it needs maintenance or repairs, hiring a reliable roofer in Seabrook Island, SC is an investment you shouldn't pass up. For South Carolina homeowners and business owners, only the best and brightest roofing experts will do when it comes to their family's happiness and safety. That's why they call on Hometown Roofing to handle all their repair, replacement, and maintenance needs.

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The Hometown Roofing Difference

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Hometown Roofing has been the top choice for roofing services in South Carolina for years. As locals of the Lowcountry, we pride ourselves on being more than just a roofing company. We're your friends and neighbors. As a family-owned business, integrity, hard work, and personalized service are at the forefront of our values. We believe in providing our loyal customers with the highest quality work completed by experts in their respective fields. Why? Because that's the way we would want to be treated, too.

At the end of the day, we strive to treat our customers with respect, confidence, and understanding. Our goal isn't to rip you off or charge you an arm and a leg for our residential or commercial roofing services. As an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, our goal is to work hard and provide you with a long-lasting product that you will love for years to come. It's really that simple. When you choose Hometown Roofing, you can rest assured that you'll get the highest quality roofing services in South Carolina, such as:

  • Roof Repair in Seabrook Island, SC
  • Roof Replacement Services
  • Roof Maintenance Services
  • Emergency Roofing Services
  • Roof Inspection Services
  • Commercial Roofing Services
Roofer Seabrook Island, SC

The Hometown Roofing Process

Whether you're in need of a complete roof replacement in Seabrook Island, SC, or minor roof maintenance, our process starts with an in-depth consultation and ends with a smile on our face.

Consultation

Consultation

At the consultation stage, we have a meeting with the client to talk about their roofing needs and evaluate the property. Based on our expertise, we provide recommendations to ensure the best solution for the client's specific roof replacement, repair, or maintenance requirements.

Detailed Proposal

Detailed Proposal

In the detailed proposal stage, we create a comprehensive document that outlines the scope of work relating to your roofing project, the materials to be used, project timeline, and estimated costs. This provides the client with a clear understanding of the roofing project, enabling them to make informed decisions.

Project Installation

Project Installation

During the project installation phase, our team of licensed experts executes the previously agreed-upon plan. We install or repair the roofing system with unmatched confidence and experience while always adhering to industry standards, safety protocols, and local laws. During this process, we strive to stay in touch every step of the way so our clients are always in the loop. We then complete your roofing project within the specified timeline so that clients experience minimal disruptions to their daily lives.

Final Inspection

Final Inspection

When it's time for the final inspection of your roofing project, our roofing contractor's work is thoroughly examined to ensure it meets our high standards and our client's roofing needs. If there is additional work to be done, we'll finish up the project ASAP. If our client has questions or concerns, we always address them before heading home. That way, our customers can rest easy at night knowing they have a reliable, well-maintained roof over their heads.

Protect Your Home or Business with Roof Repair in Seabrook Island, SC

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Living in South Carolina means experiencing unpredictable weather patterns. Bright and sunny skies can quickly turn into heavy rainfall, which can cause damage to your roof. That's why it's important to have a reliable roofing company to perform expert repairs when needed.

Whether you suspect damage has been done to your roof or you want preventative maintenance, Hometown Roofing is here to handle the hard work for you. A thorough roof inspection is the first step in understanding your repair needs. Our team will then repair any damage, like weather-worn shingles or roof leaks, to ensure your family is safe and protected.

Some of the most common roof repairs we provide for homeowners and business owners include the following:

  • Torn or Damaged Shingle Repair and Replacement
  • Tile or Shingle Replacement
  • Roof Shrinkage Issues
  • Roofing Leaks
  • Ventilation Issues
  • Pooling or Standing Water
  • Storm Damage Repair
  • Damaged Gutter Repair
  • Roof Flashing Repair
  • Much More
 Roof Repair Seabrook Island, SC

Don't wait until it's too late to schedule repairs - your roof might only be one or two South Carolina storms away from needing more than simple maintenance or repairs! South Carolina homeowners and entrepreneurs trust Hometown Roofing for their roof repairs because we:

Prioritize Safety

We put a lot of stock in the ethos of "Safety first before everything." As licensed contractors with years of experience, our roofers have the tools and training to repair your roof without you needing to worry about their safety. Of course, your safety is of utmost importance, too. Hiring an experienced professional saves you from putting yourself and your family in a compromising situation that could involve hospitals, doctors, and injuries.

Because the truth is, roof repairs usually require climbing ladders, balancing on high roofs, and working under pressure. Those aren't things an average homeowner looks forward to. By working with Hometown Roofing, you're leaving the difficult work up to highly trained experts, so you can focus on your family, not recovering from an injury sustained from DIY roofing.

Have Extensive Roofing Experience

You can tell whether a roofer is worth hiring by asking them about their roofing experience. The very best roofers usually have years, if not decades, of professional experience. Those years working up on roofs out in the sun is priceless for homeowners and business owners who want the best roofing service. At Hometown Roofing, our contractors have extensive knowledge and experience, both in advanced applications and basic roof repair theory. Unlike some roofers, Hometown Roofing team members have real-world experience and certifications - something that no amount of reading or watching YouTube videos will provide.

Maintain Warranties on Roofing Products

As a homeowner or business owner, you want every assurance that your new roof or roofing products will last for the long haul. That's why we're proud to provide a 50-year manufacturer warranty and a 20-year labor warranty on all new asphalt architectural shingle roofs. We also provide a 20-year labor warranty on all new standing seam metal roofs and a 10-year labor warranty on new tuff-rib metal roofs.

Provide High-Quality Roofing Craftsmanship

Our team at Hometown Roofing is dedicated to delivering exceptional roof repairs and top-notch service. We take pride in our work and strive for excellence when repairing, replacing, or installing roofs in South Carolina. We understand that even the smallest details matter, which is why we thoroughly inspect our work to ensure the highest quality. Our main objective is to surpass your expectations with true roofing expertise, not just average service. For long-lasting roof repairs, trust the professionals at Hometown Roofing.

 Roof Replacement Seabrook Island, SC

Reliable Roof Replacement in Seabrook Island, SC

When it comes to getting a new roof for your home, you want to make sure it's done right. That's why you need licensed professionals to handle the complex and intensive process. It may seem like a big investment, but the long-term benefits are worth it. You'll enjoy increased safety, comfort, and a higher home value. At Hometown Roofing, we're the go-to company for roof installations in South Carolina.

Our experts have completed hundreds of successful projects, and we hold ourselves to the highest standards for product longevity, customer satisfaction, and quality craftsmanship. Whether you're looking to upgrade your roof or need a replacement due to damage, we've got you covered. We specialize in many types of roof replacement projects, including:

  • Asphalt Roofs - Cost Effective, Popular, Versatile, and Appealing
  • Metal Roofs - Long Lasting, Low Maintenance, Energy Efficient, Superior Protection
  • Commercial Flat Top and TPO Roofs - Durable, Energy Efficient, UV and Chemical Resistant, Purpose Built for Your Business

When Is It Time to Replace Your Roof?

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At Hometown Roofing, one of the most common questions we get is, "How do I know when it's time to replace my roof?" That's not always an easy question to answer since every roofing structure and every roof replacement scenario is slightly different. Roofs endure harsh weather conditions like extreme heat, strong winds, freezing temperatures, and heavy rainfall, which can damage their protective layers. Although some roofs can last up to 25 years, shingles and other materials may deteriorate over time and become brittle, crack, tear, or disintegrate. While it can be challenging to assess the condition of your roof from the ground, these signs may help you determine when it's time for roof replacement in Seabrook Island, SC.

Begin Looking Indoors

It might seem counterintuitive to look for signs of disrepair inside your home, but rooms like your attic can show signs of damage much better than outside areas. Be sure to grab a powerful flashlight first and look carefully for streaks, stains, and drips. Also, keep an eye out for light beams poking through the top of your house. If you see these signs, there's a good chance your roof has leaks and should be replaced.

Cupped, Clawed, or Curled Shingles

You'll need a good view of your roof to check for these red flags, which are telltale signs that your roof is near the end of its life. Curling and cupping look alike and manifest with the ends of your shingles peeling away and pointing up. Clawing happens when the middle of a shingle lifts up while its ends stay attached to the roof. None of these conditions are good, so if you spot them, know that it could be time for a roof inspection.

Age of Your Roof

How old is your roof? If it's more than 25 years old, chances are it's on its way out. The average lifespan of an asphalt roof is 20-25 years. When that time frame passes, you should consider looking at replacing your worn-out roof.

Friends in Your Neighborhood are Replacing Roofs

If you're driving around your neighborhood and notice one or more roofers in Seabrook Island, SC, make a mental note to inspect your roof. It's common for houses in neighborhoods to be constructed at the same time, with the same materials purchased in bulk by the builder. As a result, the roofs of these homes tend to deteriorate at a similar rate. With that in mind, if you observe your neighbors replacing their roofs, it may be a sign that you should consider doing the same.

Your Roof is Sagging

A sagging roof is a sign of structural problems and may require a new roof installation. This problem is typically caused by water damage or a broken rafter, and it's important to have a licensed and insured roofing company, like Hometown Roofing, address the issue. To properly diagnose the problem, the contractor may need to remove the shingles and plywood sheathing underneath.

Roofer Seabrook Island, SC
 Roof Repair Seabrook Island, SC

Emergency Roof Repair in Seabrook Island, SC

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Hometown Roofing is available to assist when disaster strikes. We recognize that roofing emergencies can occur at any time, so we provide 24/7 emergency roofing services to homeowners in our community. Here is an overview of the critical emergency services we offer:

Available 24/7
Available 24/7

When you're in a roofing emergency, Hometown Roofing is always here to help. Our expert team is available 24/7 to respond quickly and professionally to any crisis. We understand that your home's safety is your top priority, and we're committed to mitigating damage and providing peace of mind during difficult times.

Help with Insurance Claims
Help with Insurance Claims

Dealing with insurance claims can be overwhelming, especially after a disaster. That's why Hometown Roofing offers assistance navigating the complicated process of working with your insurance company. We'll help you document the damage and submit the necessary paperwork to your insurance provider, ensuring a smoother and more successful claim.

Emergency Roof Tarping
Emergency Roof Tarping

If your roof has suffered severe damage and can't be repaired immediately, our emergency tarping service can provide temporary protection from further harm. This solution will safeguard your home from the elements until repairs can be made. Trust Hometown Roofing to keep your home safe and secure in any roofing emergency.

Storm Damage Repair
Storm Damage Repair

When severe weather hits, your roof can take a beating. From losing shingles to damaging the structure, it can leave your home vulnerable. That's where Hometown Roofing comes in. We offer quick and reliable storm damage repair services to ensure your roof is safe and secure once again.

Stabilize Your Home's Structure
Stabilize Your Home's Structure

If your roof has been severely damaged by a fallen tree or other catastrophic event, call Hometown Roofing ASAP. Our team is here to help. We'll stabilize your roof, preventing any potential collapse or further damage, helping provide peace of mind and comfort in a trying time.

Remove Debris
Remove Debris

After a storm, your roof can be covered in debris that may cause additional damage if left unattended. Our experienced professionals are equipped to safely remove any debris, ultimately preserving the lifespan of your roof.

Temporary Roof Repair in Seabrook Island, SC
Temporary Roof Repair in Seabrook Island, SC

Sometimes, extensive repairs to your roof can't be completed immediately after an emergency. Our team of roofing experts can provide a temporary fix so that your home is safe, dry, and protected from more damage.

Repairs for Emergency Leaks
Repairs for Emergency Leaks

When your roof sprouts a leak suddenly, it can be catastrophic. Hometown Roofing professionals will locate the source of your leak and provide a quick, effective solution to your problem.

Emergency Roof Inspections
Emergency Roof Inspections

When a severe weather event or other emergency incident occurs, you may need a roof inspection to assess the totality of your damage. Hometown Roofing inspections identify needed repairs. That way, you plan for the next steps and do what's necessary to protect your roof and your family.

Hometown Roofing: South Carolina's Premier Choice for Quality Roofing Services

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Hometown Roofing was born out of a rich legacy and a steadfast commitment to quality. Unlike many roofing companies in South Carolina, we stand by the ethos of doing everything right and never cutting corners. We extend that commitment to your home, whether you need minor roof repairs, a total roof replacement, or something in between. Contact our office to schedule your initial consultation today.

 Roof Replacement Seabrook Island, SC

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132 E 2nd N St, Summerville, SC 29483

Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

Editorial: We dodged a bullet on Seabrook. Make sure it doesn’t happen again.

Everyone who cares about southern Johns Island should be pleased that a controversial annexation was pulled from the Seabrook Island Town Council’s agenda last week in the face of mounting opposition over what the annexation would help create — a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages — and the likelihood that it would add more traffic and pollution to the rural side of Charleston County’s urban growth boundary.But those same folks, particularly leaders on Kiawah and Seab...

Everyone who cares about southern Johns Island should be pleased that a controversial annexation was pulled from the Seabrook Island Town Council’s agenda last week in the face of mounting opposition over what the annexation would help create — a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages — and the likelihood that it would add more traffic and pollution to the rural side of Charleston County’s urban growth boundary.

But those same folks, particularly leaders on Kiawah and Seabrook islands and Charleston County Council, should not get complacent. Instead, they need to work together on better planning to guide development in and around where those two sea islands meet up with southern Johns Island.

It’s unclear when, or if, the developer’s annexation request might resurface. Even if it doesn’t, there undoubtedly will be other development plans that will expose the tensions between those living on rural Johns Island and those living beyond the gates at Kiawah and Seabrook. This moment offers an important reset, one that should begin with getting all these local governments to recommit to the vision of an urban growth boundary — a line past which suburban development would not be supported through zoning, infrastructure or other local policies.

Such a recommitment wouldn’t bind future councils any more than their respective comprehensive plans do, but it would send a unified message about their mutual commitment to respect the natural beauty and environmental sensitivity of the area.

It’s clear that development pressures at Kiawah’s and Seabrook’s doorstep are increasing. A fresh series of new developments, including a senior living facility and an emergency medical facility, is cropping up. Elected officials, neighborhood leaders and county planners need to come up with a mutually agreed-upon zoning overlay for the area, one that would guide future development to ensure new uses and the size and scale of new buildings are appropriate. Such an overlay also would prevent developers from trying to play one jurisdiction against another to get the permits they seek, a tactic sometimes used in other parts of the tri-county area.

The mutual interests of everyone became clear during this recent annexation controversy, as the mayor of Kiawah Island took the unusual step of sending a letter to Seabrook’s mayor and council urging them to reject the annexation and respect the urban growth boundary, which Mayor John Labriola noted “serves as a guide to direct appropriate urban and suburban development while preserving and cherishing the rural charm of the Sea Islands that we all hold dear.”

Given what we’ve seen this summer, the existing urban growth boundary line may not continue to be enough on its own, and we believe a joint planning effort could help pin down the following: to what extent commercial development in the greater Freshfields area should be allowed to inch its way north on Betsy Kerrison; whether the towns should annex any more of Johns Island; whether any upzoning in the area might be appropriate; and how new building would affect the net traffic and drainage needs around Kiawah and Seabrook. While residents live only on Kiawah or Seabrook or in the unincorporated area, they have a stake in the answers to all those questions. This area deserves a new zoning overlay and conservation goals that offer a shared vision of how the southern part of Johns Island will — and will not — change.

Regional planning needs to take place on a large scale — such as our greater metro area from Seabrook to Awendaw to Summerville and Moncks Corner — but it’s also necessary on a smaller scale, especially in those places such as southern Johns Island where multiple local governmental jurisdictions meet.

Decades ago, the city of Charleston and Charleston County came up with the urban growth boundary across Johns Island and other areas where the suburbs ended to ensure their zoning and other policies worked together to protect rural areas that residents wanted to remain rural. Kiawah and Seabrook were once seen as too distant to bring into the conversation about that line. That’s not the case any more.

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Plans for yacht club concerns sea island residents

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The potential for a new yacht club and several docks on Seabrook Island is concerning Sea Islanders and environmental advocates.Town of Seabrook leaders discussed those plans Wednesday, which would include the annexation of a portion of Charleston County into Seabrook island.The town’s planning commission voted 4-1 to recommend moving forward with the annexation to the town council.The nearly 18-acre site, called the “Andell Tract,” sits between Bohicket Marina and Betsy K...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The potential for a new yacht club and several docks on Seabrook Island is concerning Sea Islanders and environmental advocates.

Town of Seabrook leaders discussed those plans Wednesday, which would include the annexation of a portion of Charleston County into Seabrook island.

The town’s planning commission voted 4-1 to recommend moving forward with the annexation to the town council.

The nearly 18-acre site, called the “Andell Tract,” sits between Bohicket Marina and Betsy Kerrison Parkway on Johns Island.

the plan includes a private Yacht Club and amenities such as a boat house, pool house and detached hotel containing 10 two-story cottages, according to town documents.

It also has public spaces including a boardwalk, pathways and a community crabbing dock.

Dana Beach, the founder of the Coastal Conservation League, said his two main concerns about the proposal are the environmental impacts on the water, and the crossing of Charleston County’s Urban Growth Boundary.

He said if The Town of Seabrook annexes this portion of Charleston County into their town for development, it could set a precedent for other local municipalities to do the same.

“The town may say ‘this is only a 20-acre parcel that in itself isn’t a big deal,” Beach said. “That’s what Charleston could say if it wanted to coming down from the north, that’s what Kiawah could say as it comes in from the East, even Folly Beach could say that.”

Robby Maynor, the Communities and Transportation Program Director for Coastal Conservation League echoed Beach’s point while addressing the planning commission at Wednesday’s meeting.

“There is an ongoing effort for collaboration between the municipalities on the sea islands to reaffirm that growth boundary to help strike a balance between development and preservation, this annexation would be a step in the wrong direction,” Maynor said.

The majority of the 544 written comments and 10 in person comments were against the development, although some community members spoke in its’ favor.

“I believe a Yacht Club is an amenity that fits perfectly within our diverse group of people,” Seabrook resident, Jackie Helline, said.

Mike Shuler, the Owner and Managing Partner for Bohicket Marina Investors, said he respectfully disagrees with the fear that this annexation may set a precedent for other municipalities to cross Charleston County’s Urban Growth boundary.

“What we are annexing is part of Seabrook’s comprehensive plan. Whether it crosses an Urban Growth Boundary, in my opinion, isn’t relevant here,” Shuler said. “Not to mention, further expansion beyond the property we are contemplating here is not possible because of conservation easements that are in place.”

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Here’s your guide to what Kiawah and Seabrook islands have to offer

Just 25 miles from downtown Charleston, Kiawah and Seabrook islands are the destinations for anyone looking to escape the bustle of the city.These islands offer so much more than beautiful beaches. They have sports, spas, top restaurants and amazing shopping.We’ve compiled a guide for tourists and locals drawn to the islands’ natural beauty. Whether you like fine dining or a relaxed day on the golf course or the beach, we have a guide for you.ExploreThe two barrier islands each offer world-class golf...

Just 25 miles from downtown Charleston, Kiawah and Seabrook islands are the destinations for anyone looking to escape the bustle of the city.

These islands offer so much more than beautiful beaches. They have sports, spas, top restaurants and amazing shopping.

We’ve compiled a guide for tourists and locals drawn to the islands’ natural beauty. Whether you like fine dining or a relaxed day on the golf course or the beach, we have a guide for you.

Explore

The two barrier islands each offer world-class golf courses that have been featured in major sporting events. Anyone looking to live out their professional golf fantasy can find a home at Kiawah Island Golf Resort’s Ocean Course. The resort has twice hosted the PGA Golf Championship, in 2012 and in 2021.

The resort renovated all of its courses in preparation for the 2021 tournament which brought thousands of fans to the island.

Those looking for a golf membership should also consider the Seabrook Island Club. The club’s two courses, Ocean Winds and Crooked Oaks, are open to members, group outings and events.

The two islands aren’t just for golfers; they also feature world-class beaches. Kiawah alone has 10 miles of beaches. The Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission operates Beachwalker County Park, the only beach on the island open to the public.

Seabrook’s Pelican and North beaches also offer views of the sunset and sunrise, although they are not open to the public. The rest of Kiawah’s beaches are privately owned, so those looking for a longer stay should consider all-access options.

The islands are also a great place to explore Lowcountry wildlife. Those looking to get up close to dolphins should visit the northernmost tip of North Beach during low tide at Seabrook or Captain Sam’s Inlet on Kiawah. Bottlenose dolphins are known to strand-feed there — a technique the dolphins used to trap fish and drive them onto sandbars and shorelines.

This week we sought reader photos that glisten and gleam.

This week’s winner is Herbert M. Schiller who took a photo of the Hungarian Parliament building in Budapest on the Danube River.

Honorable mentions go to Dale Johnson and Ronald Allen Charles. Johnson’s photo captured glowing, floating spheres at Universal Studios. Charles’ photo was of glowing light fixtures at a shop in Venice, Italy.

Next week’s topic is new, so show off your best photos of new things or new beginnings in honor of the new year.

The rules: Send your best photo to [email protected] by noon Thursday. Include your name, town and where the photo was taken. Add your name and the topic to the file. If you want your photo to be eligible to run in the newspaper, it must be at least 1,500 pixels, not have a commercial watermark and not have been published in another publication.

On Fridays, we first announce the editors’ pick of the week at postandcourier.com/yourphotos and declare a topic for the next week. On Saturdays, we publish an online gallery.

On Sunday, the photo pick of the week will appear in this section, Life.

All photos submitted will be considered for publication in The Post and Courier’s yearly magazine, My Charleston. Some images may be selected for other editorial or noncommercial use.

We reserve the right to not publish any photo for any reason.

Get a weekly list of tips on pop-ups, last minute tickets and little-known experiences hand-selected by our newsroom in your inbox each Thursday.

Hicks: No smooth sailing in the forecast for Seabrook annexation plan

For its first annexation in more than 30 years, Seabrook Island’s Town Council picked a real doozy.Next week, council will likely vote to annex nearly 18 acres on Bohicket Creek — just across from neighboring Kiawah Island’s Town Hall — for a mixed-use development designed around a marina and private yacht club.The details are a tad fuzzy (well, as much as they can be with a 200-page proposal), but public sentiment is not.Nearly 600 residents have expressed concerns about the project’s poten...

For its first annexation in more than 30 years, Seabrook Island’s Town Council picked a real doozy.

Next week, council will likely vote to annex nearly 18 acres on Bohicket Creek — just across from neighboring Kiawah Island’s Town Hall — for a mixed-use development designed around a marina and private yacht club.

The details are a tad fuzzy (well, as much as they can be with a 200-page proposal), but public sentiment is not.

Nearly 600 residents have expressed concerns about the project’s potential environmental, traffic and flooding impact. That’s more than a quarter of the island’s full-time residents.

They’ve made it clear they don’t want this, but feel like no one’s listening.

“The vast majority of people have been opposed to this,” says island resident Paul McLaughlin. “They don’t have to listen to us, but don’t go and ask for our opinion if you don’t listen to the answers. It offers no benefit to us; it’s a private club.”

His frustration is understandable, because a lot of people have valid concerns.

The state already considers that stretch of Bohicket too contaminated for oyster harvesting; the feds say it’s not safe to eat fish caught there. The state turned down similar plans 30 years ago … which is about the last time Seabrook gave any thought to expanding its borders.

McLaughlin notes the developer’s plan may address flooding on the property, but what does it do to the rest of the island?

Residents can’t leverage their usual influence over local officials, several of whom publicly support the plan, because most of them aren’t running for reelection.

It’s sort of a perfect storm — and, on Seabrook, it’s definitely storm season.

Local government is usually the most responsive to local citizens. A couple dozen bicyclists can — and did — derail Charleston’s carefully negotiated plans to redesign downtown’s King Street. But hundreds of well-heeled retirees can’t move the needle?

The island’s planning commission recommended the annexation on a 4-1 vote in July over vocal opposition. Residents get one more chance next week at a public hearing prior to an initial annexation vote, but aren’t optimistic.

They’ll get 30 minutes — three minutes per speaker — to relay their concerns in a room that holds an audience of about 60. That’s pretty standard operating procedure for local governments, but Seabrook residents are livid. The town, they say, has ignored repeated calls for a larger venue and more time.

Seabrook Mayor John Gregg says the developer has held informational meetings with residents for the past year, and when the island got the proposal in June, the town posted all documents online.

He says the alternative meeting venues suggested are all behind Seabrook’s private gate — and council meetings must be accessible to the public. Besides, he says, Town Hall is fitted with equipment to broadcast the meeting to the entire island.

If more people want to speak than time allows, the mayor says, speakers will be chosen by a random number algorithm generator.

That probably won’t make residents, or others, happy. Because this isn’t just some not-in-my-backyard grousing. The Coastal Conservation League, the nonprofit Kiawah Conservancy and various Johns Island advocates have also objected. Even Kiawah has taken an unprecedented stand.

Earlier this month, Kiawah Mayor John D. Labriola and Town Council members sent a letter to Seabrook, publicly opposing the annexation.

“We strongly believe that maintaining the current [urban growth boundary] is critically important to protect the unique Sea Islands ecosystem and the rural character of the land outside the boundary for future generations,” Labriola wrote.

That’s called foreshadowing.

Seabrook Councilwoman Jeri Finke wrote in the most recent issue of The Seabrooker that annexing the land gives the town control over it, which is better than allowing Charleston County or Kiawah to make the decisions. Her argument hasn’t moved many.

That’s because Kiawah Mayor Labriola hit on a salient point. Since the land falls outside the urban growth boundary, its potential development would be fairly limited … if Seabrook just stayed out of this.

See, right now that land falls under county jurisdiction, and County Council would never ignore such a large and influential group of citizens.

But Seabrook’s annexation blocks county intervention because the town isn’t party to the urban growth boundary agreement. That allows a few outgoing public officials to open the door to new development.

The Andell tract, as this land is called, sits at the end of Betsy Kerrison Parkway — an area just outside two wealthy communities under tremendous development pressure. Already, more businesses, a retirement community and an entire medical district are in the works.

But that land was never meant to be developed, at least not to this extent. That’s what the urban growth boundary dictates. The overdevelopment of Maybank Highway was meant as a trade-off to leave the rest of Johns Island largely rural.

Such plans often shrivel when there’s money to be made — this is proof of that. But the marina development could also bring renewed scrutiny to the urban growth boundary and spark radical change ... because people are sick of overdevelopment.

But that’s a story for another day.

At the hyper-local level, Seabrook officials should know their audience ... er, constituents. These are people who know how to get things done. They know how to file lawsuits. And they don’t give up.

So don’t expect next week’s vote to be the last word.

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Beyond Our Gates Foundation of Kiawah and Seabrook Islands Grants $300,000 to 16 Charleston Nonprofits

"Linda Gadson is a force of nature, and she has inspired so many people and changed so many lives on Charleston's five Sea Islands, and beyond. -Brian McDonagh, Founder, Beyond Out Gates FoundationCHARLESTON, SC, December 20, 2023 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Beyond Our Gates Foundation of Kiawah and Seabrook Islands proudly announces a momentous contribution of $300,000 to 16 nonprofit organizations in Charleston, South Carolina, in honor of Linda Gadson, the legendary first black woman graduate of the College of Charleston. The...

"Linda Gadson is a force of nature, and she has inspired so many people and changed so many lives on Charleston's five Sea Islands, and beyond. -Brian McDonagh, Founder, Beyond Out Gates Foundation

CHARLESTON, SC, December 20, 2023 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Beyond Our Gates Foundation of Kiawah and Seabrook Islands proudly announces a momentous contribution of $300,000 to 16 nonprofit organizations in Charleston, South Carolina, in honor of Linda Gadson, the legendary first black woman graduate of the College of Charleston. The grants, given as a tribute to Linda Gadson's 50 years of tireless humanitarian work, will support various causes, embodying her legacy of feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, and providing shelter to indigent residents of Charleston's Five Sea Islands.

Linda Gadson, a recipient of the 2010 Order of the Palmetto, the State of South Carolina's Highest Civilian Honor, has been a beacon of compassion and change in the community. Known as "The Mother Teresa of the Sea Islands," Linda's impact on the lives of Charleston's five Sea Islands has been immeasurable.

Beyond Our Gates Foundation of Kiawah and Seabrook Islands, founded by Brian McDonagh and Karen McDonagh, aims to continue Linda Gadson's transformative work. The foundation, recognizing the economic challenges faced by the residents of Charleston's five Sea Islands, seeks to provide a philanthropic avenue for the residents of Kiawah and Seabrook Islands to address these challenges directly.

Brian McDonagh, Founder and President of Beyond Our Gates Foundation, expressed, "Linda Gadson is a force of nature, and she has inspired so many people and changed so many lives on Charleston's five Sea Islands, and beyond. This initial round of grants totaling $300,000.00, to these 16 nonprofit organizations in Charleston, are to honor Linda Gadson- who she is, what she has meant, and the lives that she has transformed- and to show the world that she is indeed a world changer."

The grants are a testament to the commitment of Beyond Our Gates Foundation to amplify philanthropic giving and address economic challenges. The foundation encourages the community to share Linda Gadson's story and the mission of Beyond Our Gates to raise awareness about the critical work being done.

About Beyond Our Gates Foundation Beyond Our Gates Foundation of Kiawah and Seabrook Islands is dedicated to continuing the humanitarian work of Linda Gadson by providing support and philanthropic avenues for the residents of Kiawah and Seabrook Islands to address economic challenges in Charleston's five Sea Islands.

For additional information or media inquiries, please contact Shaytee Gadson at [email protected] or 843-518-8459.

About Beyond Our Gates Foundation Beyond Our Gates Foundation of Kiawah and Seabrook Islands is dedicated to continuing the humanitarian work of Linda Gadson by providing support and philanthropic avenues for the residents of Kiawah and Seabrook Islands to address economic challenges in Charleston's five Sea Islands.

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