Protecting your family, in our Hometown, for a LIFETIME!

roofer in Columbia, SC

Have you ever taken a second to really think about how important your home's roof is to your health and safety? It's so much more than a simple hat for your house. It protects you from the elements like rain, sleet, snow, and wind. It helps keep you and your family warm in the winter and cool in the summer. Those harmful pests and critters you see roaming around your property? Your roof helps keep them away from your family, too.

When you take those points into account, it becomes clear that your home's roof is crucial for year-round well-being and comfort. So, when your roof is nearing the end of its life, or it needs maintenance or repairs, hiring a reliable roofer in Columbia, SC is an investment you shouldn't pass up. For South Carolina homeowners and business owners, only the best and brightest roofing experts will do when it comes to their family's happiness and safety. That's why they call on Hometown Roofing to handle all their repair, replacement, and maintenance needs.

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The Hometown Roofing Difference

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Hometown Roofing has been the top choice for roofing services in South Carolina for years. As locals of the Lowcountry, we pride ourselves on being more than just a roofing company. We're your friends and neighbors. As a family-owned business, integrity, hard work, and personalized service are at the forefront of our values. We believe in providing our loyal customers with the highest quality work completed by experts in their respective fields. Why? Because that's the way we would want to be treated, too.

At the end of the day, we strive to treat our customers with respect, confidence, and understanding. Our goal isn't to rip you off or charge you an arm and a leg for our residential or commercial roofing services. As an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, our goal is to work hard and provide you with a long-lasting product that you will love for years to come. It's really that simple. When you choose Hometown Roofing, you can rest assured that you'll get the highest quality roofing services in South Carolina, such as:

  • Roof Repair in Columbia, SC
  • Roof Replacement Services
  • Roof Maintenance Services
  • Emergency Roofing Services
  • Roof Inspection Services
  • Commercial Roofing Services
Roofer Columbia, SC

The Hometown Roofing Process

Whether you're in need of a complete roof replacement in Columbia, SC, or minor roof maintenance, our process starts with an in-depth consultation and ends with a smile on our face.

Consultation

Consultation

At the consultation stage, we have a meeting with the client to talk about their roofing needs and evaluate the property. Based on our expertise, we provide recommendations to ensure the best solution for the client's specific roof replacement, repair, or maintenance requirements.

Detailed Proposal

Detailed Proposal

In the detailed proposal stage, we create a comprehensive document that outlines the scope of work relating to your roofing project, the materials to be used, project timeline, and estimated costs. This provides the client with a clear understanding of the roofing project, enabling them to make informed decisions.

Project Installation

Project Installation

During the project installation phase, our team of licensed experts executes the previously agreed-upon plan. We install or repair the roofing system with unmatched confidence and experience while always adhering to industry standards, safety protocols, and local laws. During this process, we strive to stay in touch every step of the way so our clients are always in the loop. We then complete your roofing project within the specified timeline so that clients experience minimal disruptions to their daily lives.

Final Inspection

Final Inspection

When it's time for the final inspection of your roofing project, our roofing contractor's work is thoroughly examined to ensure it meets our high standards and our client's roofing needs. If there is additional work to be done, we'll finish up the project ASAP. If our client has questions or concerns, we always address them before heading home. That way, our customers can rest easy at night knowing they have a reliable, well-maintained roof over their heads.

Protect Your Home or Business with Roof Repair in Columbia, SC

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Living in South Carolina means experiencing unpredictable weather patterns. Bright and sunny skies can quickly turn into heavy rainfall, which can cause damage to your roof. That's why it's important to have a reliable roofing company to perform expert repairs when needed.

Whether you suspect damage has been done to your roof or you want preventative maintenance, Hometown Roofing is here to handle the hard work for you. A thorough roof inspection is the first step in understanding your repair needs. Our team will then repair any damage, like weather-worn shingles or roof leaks, to ensure your family is safe and protected.

Some of the most common roof repairs we provide for homeowners and business owners include the following:

  • Torn or Damaged Shingle Repair and Replacement
  • Tile or Shingle Replacement
  • Roof Shrinkage Issues
  • Roofing Leaks
  • Ventilation Issues
  • Pooling or Standing Water
  • Storm Damage Repair
  • Damaged Gutter Repair
  • Roof Flashing Repair
  • Much More
 Roof Repair Columbia, SC

Don't wait until it's too late to schedule repairs - your roof might only be one or two South Carolina storms away from needing more than simple maintenance or repairs! South Carolina homeowners and entrepreneurs trust Hometown Roofing for their roof repairs because we:

Prioritize Safety

We put a lot of stock in the ethos of "Safety first before everything." As licensed contractors with years of experience, our roofers have the tools and training to repair your roof without you needing to worry about their safety. Of course, your safety is of utmost importance, too. Hiring an experienced professional saves you from putting yourself and your family in a compromising situation that could involve hospitals, doctors, and injuries.

Because the truth is, roof repairs usually require climbing ladders, balancing on high roofs, and working under pressure. Those aren't things an average homeowner looks forward to. By working with Hometown Roofing, you're leaving the difficult work up to highly trained experts, so you can focus on your family, not recovering from an injury sustained from DIY roofing.

Have Extensive Roofing Experience

You can tell whether a roofer is worth hiring by asking them about their roofing experience. The very best roofers usually have years, if not decades, of professional experience. Those years working up on roofs out in the sun is priceless for homeowners and business owners who want the best roofing service. At Hometown Roofing, our contractors have extensive knowledge and experience, both in advanced applications and basic roof repair theory. Unlike some roofers, Hometown Roofing team members have real-world experience and certifications - something that no amount of reading or watching YouTube videos will provide.

Maintain Warranties on Roofing Products

As a homeowner or business owner, you want every assurance that your new roof or roofing products will last for the long haul. That's why we're proud to provide a 50-year manufacturer warranty and a 20-year labor warranty on all new asphalt architectural shingle roofs. We also provide a 20-year labor warranty on all new standing seam metal roofs and a 10-year labor warranty on new tuff-rib metal roofs.

Provide High-Quality Roofing Craftsmanship

Our team at Hometown Roofing is dedicated to delivering exceptional roof repairs and top-notch service. We take pride in our work and strive for excellence when repairing, replacing, or installing roofs in South Carolina. We understand that even the smallest details matter, which is why we thoroughly inspect our work to ensure the highest quality. Our main objective is to surpass your expectations with true roofing expertise, not just average service. For long-lasting roof repairs, trust the professionals at Hometown Roofing.

 Roof Replacement Columbia, SC

Reliable Roof Replacement in Columbia, SC

When it comes to getting a new roof for your home, you want to make sure it's done right. That's why you need licensed professionals to handle the complex and intensive process. It may seem like a big investment, but the long-term benefits are worth it. You'll enjoy increased safety, comfort, and a higher home value. At Hometown Roofing, we're the go-to company for roof installations in South Carolina.

Our experts have completed hundreds of successful projects, and we hold ourselves to the highest standards for product longevity, customer satisfaction, and quality craftsmanship. Whether you're looking to upgrade your roof or need a replacement due to damage, we've got you covered. We specialize in many types of roof replacement projects, including:

  • Asphalt Roofs - Cost Effective, Popular, Versatile, and Appealing
  • Metal Roofs - Long Lasting, Low Maintenance, Energy Efficient, Superior Protection
  • Commercial Flat Top and TPO Roofs - Durable, Energy Efficient, UV and Chemical Resistant, Purpose Built for Your Business

When Is It Time to Replace Your Roof?

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At Hometown Roofing, one of the most common questions we get is, "How do I know when it's time to replace my roof?" That's not always an easy question to answer since every roofing structure and every roof replacement scenario is slightly different. Roofs endure harsh weather conditions like extreme heat, strong winds, freezing temperatures, and heavy rainfall, which can damage their protective layers. Although some roofs can last up to 25 years, shingles and other materials may deteriorate over time and become brittle, crack, tear, or disintegrate. While it can be challenging to assess the condition of your roof from the ground, these signs may help you determine when it's time for roof replacement in Columbia, SC.

Begin Looking Indoors

It might seem counterintuitive to look for signs of disrepair inside your home, but rooms like your attic can show signs of damage much better than outside areas. Be sure to grab a powerful flashlight first and look carefully for streaks, stains, and drips. Also, keep an eye out for light beams poking through the top of your house. If you see these signs, there's a good chance your roof has leaks and should be replaced.

Cupped, Clawed, or Curled Shingles

You'll need a good view of your roof to check for these red flags, which are telltale signs that your roof is near the end of its life. Curling and cupping look alike and manifest with the ends of your shingles peeling away and pointing up. Clawing happens when the middle of a shingle lifts up while its ends stay attached to the roof. None of these conditions are good, so if you spot them, know that it could be time for a roof inspection.

Age of Your Roof

How old is your roof? If it's more than 25 years old, chances are it's on its way out. The average lifespan of an asphalt roof is 20-25 years. When that time frame passes, you should consider looking at replacing your worn-out roof.

Friends in Your Neighborhood are Replacing Roofs

If you're driving around your neighborhood and notice one or more roofers in Columbia, SC, make a mental note to inspect your roof. It's common for houses in neighborhoods to be constructed at the same time, with the same materials purchased in bulk by the builder. As a result, the roofs of these homes tend to deteriorate at a similar rate. With that in mind, if you observe your neighbors replacing their roofs, it may be a sign that you should consider doing the same.

Your Roof is Sagging

A sagging roof is a sign of structural problems and may require a new roof installation. This problem is typically caused by water damage or a broken rafter, and it's important to have a licensed and insured roofing company, like Hometown Roofing, address the issue. To properly diagnose the problem, the contractor may need to remove the shingles and plywood sheathing underneath.

Roofer Columbia, SC
 Roof Repair Columbia, SC

Emergency Roof Repair in Columbia, SC

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Hometown Roofing is available to assist when disaster strikes. We recognize that roofing emergencies can occur at any time, so we provide 24/7 emergency roofing services to homeowners in our community. Here is an overview of the critical emergency services we offer:

Available 24/7
Available 24/7

When you're in a roofing emergency, Hometown Roofing is always here to help. Our expert team is available 24/7 to respond quickly and professionally to any crisis. We understand that your home's safety is your top priority, and we're committed to mitigating damage and providing peace of mind during difficult times.

Help with Insurance Claims
Help with Insurance Claims

Dealing with insurance claims can be overwhelming, especially after a disaster. That's why Hometown Roofing offers assistance navigating the complicated process of working with your insurance company. We'll help you document the damage and submit the necessary paperwork to your insurance provider, ensuring a smoother and more successful claim.

Emergency Roof Tarping
Emergency Roof Tarping

If your roof has suffered severe damage and can't be repaired immediately, our emergency tarping service can provide temporary protection from further harm. This solution will safeguard your home from the elements until repairs can be made. Trust Hometown Roofing to keep your home safe and secure in any roofing emergency.

Storm Damage Repair
Storm Damage Repair

When severe weather hits, your roof can take a beating. From losing shingles to damaging the structure, it can leave your home vulnerable. That's where Hometown Roofing comes in. We offer quick and reliable storm damage repair services to ensure your roof is safe and secure once again.

Stabilize Your Home's Structure
Stabilize Your Home's Structure

If your roof has been severely damaged by a fallen tree or other catastrophic event, call Hometown Roofing ASAP. Our team is here to help. We'll stabilize your roof, preventing any potential collapse or further damage, helping provide peace of mind and comfort in a trying time.

Remove Debris
Remove Debris

After a storm, your roof can be covered in debris that may cause additional damage if left unattended. Our experienced professionals are equipped to safely remove any debris, ultimately preserving the lifespan of your roof.

Temporary Roof Repair in Columbia, SC
Temporary Roof Repair in Columbia, SC

Sometimes, extensive repairs to your roof can't be completed immediately after an emergency. Our team of roofing experts can provide a temporary fix so that your home is safe, dry, and protected from more damage.

Repairs for Emergency Leaks
Repairs for Emergency Leaks

When your roof sprouts a leak suddenly, it can be catastrophic. Hometown Roofing professionals will locate the source of your leak and provide a quick, effective solution to your problem.

Emergency Roof Inspections
Emergency Roof Inspections

When a severe weather event or other emergency incident occurs, you may need a roof inspection to assess the totality of your damage. Hometown Roofing inspections identify needed repairs. That way, you plan for the next steps and do what's necessary to protect your roof and your family.

Hometown Roofing: South Carolina's Premier Choice for Quality Roofing Services

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Hometown Roofing was born out of a rich legacy and a steadfast commitment to quality. Unlike many roofing companies in South Carolina, we stand by the ethos of doing everything right and never cutting corners. We extend that commitment to your home, whether you need minor roof repairs, a total roof replacement, or something in between. Contact our office to schedule your initial consultation today.

 Roof Replacement Columbia, SC

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132 E 2nd N St, Summerville, SC 29483

Latest News in Columbia, SC

Tornado watch, severe thunderstorm warning issued as dangerous weather hits Midlands

As powerful storms bear down on South Carolina Tuesday, a tornado watch was issued for the Midlands, according to the National Weather Service.A wind advisory previously went into effect at 6 a.m.The tor...

As powerful storms bear down on South Carolina Tuesday, a tornado watch was issued for the Midlands, according to the National Weather Service.

A wind advisory previously went into effect at 6 a.m.

The tornado watch is in effect until 6 p.m. in both Richland County and Lexington County, as well as Calhoun, Clarendon, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lee, Newberry, Orangeburg, Saluda and Sumter counties, the National Weather Service said.

Shortly after 1 p.m., a severe thunderstorm warning was issued for parts of Richland, Lexington, Fairfield, Newberry, Saluda, Aiken and Edgefield counties, according to the National Weather Service. The warning is in effect through 2 p.m., as a line of storms was moving at 50 mph, the National Weather Service said.

The warning was extended to 3 p.m. for Columbia, Lexington and West Columbia.

“Remain alert for a possible tornado!” The National Weather Service said. “Tornadoes can develop quickly from severe thunderstorms. If you spot a tornado go at once into the basement or small central room in a sturdy structure.”

Additionally, the National Weather Service said anybody on or near Lake Murray should move away from the water and take shelter.

This announcement came hours after a flood advisory was issued for Columbia, and flood warnings were put in place in other counties across the Midlands, according to the National Weather Service. Possible flooding of the Congaree River could impact both Richland and Lexington counties, the National Weather Service said.

The risk of flash flooding is low but possible, especially in the northern parts of the Midlands and in urban areas where drainage is poor, National Weather Service meteorologists said in a Tuesday morning briefing. There is a greater risk of river flooding beginning Wednesday, according to the briefing.

But powerful, gusty winds remain the greatest threat posed by the storms that are moving into the Columbia area, the National Weather Service said.

The storms are expected to increase in strength by the afternoon, and will remain a threat into the night, according to the briefing. The Midlands can expect the greatest impacts between noon and 6 p.m., but the effects will be present hours before and later, the National Weather Service said.

Strong winds are predicted, with powerful gusts that could reach 45 mph, according to the briefing. Some wind gusts could be enhanced by thunderstorms and might exceed 70 mph, the National Weather Service said.

At the peak of the storms, maximum sustained winds outside of the thunderstorms are predicted to be at about 30 mph in the Columbia area, according to the briefing.

Additionally, there’s the potential for a few tornadoes to be embedded within lines of storms, and a significant EF2+ tornado, with gusts as powerful as 135 mph, is possible, the National Weather Service said.

The wind advisory is in effect until at least 10 p.m., meteorologists said.

Gusty winds will blow around unsecured objects.

Powerful winds and tornadoes could cause considerable damage to trees and branches, in addition to structures including mobile homes, roofs and outbuildings. Vehicles would also be under siege in the case of a tornado.

Damage to trees and branches creates the possibility of downed power lines and outages.

As of 11:45 a.m., more than 19,000 outages were reported in South Carolina.

Meteorologists also urged drivers to use caution on Tuesday because winds this strong can make driving difficult.

This prompted most Midlands school districts to close buildings and switch to e-learning for students on Tuesday.

“If you must drive during the worst of the weather, adjust your speed and follow distance accordingly,” the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said on social media.

Strong to severe thunderstorms and heavy rainfall is also included in a hazardous weather outlook for the Columbia area.

There is a 100% chance of precipitation in Columbia, and more than an inch of rain is possible Tuesday, the forecast shows. Localized amounts in other areas of the Midlands could be higher. Previous rainfall predictions called for more precipitation to accumulate, but have since been reduced because the storms are expected to be fast moving, according to the briefing.

“Most flooding deaths occur in vehicles,” the National Weather Service said. “Never drive through a flooded roadway or around barricades. Turn around, don’t drown.”

Even after the storms move out of the area, the effects are expected to linger. Conditions on Wednesday morning and afternoon are predicted to be breezy, with wind gusts potentially exceeding 30 mph, according to the briefing.

There won’t be much time before more severe weather is expected to affect the Midlands, as the potential for powerful thunderstorms with strong winds and a 90% chance of rain is in the Friday forecast, according to the National Weather Service.

Lightning and tornadoes are equally as dangerous. Here are some lightning safety tips from the National Weather Service. By National Weather Service

In a breaking news situation, facts can be unclear and the situation may still be developing. The State is trying to get important information to the public as quickly and accurately as possible. This story will be updated as more information becomes available, and some information in this story may change as the facts become clearer. Refresh this page later for more updated information.

This story was originally published January 9, 2024, 8:17 AM.

Midlands government offices close ahead of severe weather

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WIS) - As the storm system makes its way closer to the Palmetto State, many county government offices are closing.The following county offices are closed or closing early on Tuesday:Clarendon County Will close early at noonFairfield CountyWill close early at noonKershaw CountyOpenLee CountyWill close early at noonLexington CountyOpenNewberry CountyOpenRichland CountyOpen...

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WIS) - As the storm system makes its way closer to the Palmetto State, many county government offices are closing.

The following county offices are closed or closing early on Tuesday:

Clarendon County

Will close early at noon

Fairfield County

Will close early at noon

Kershaw County

Open

Lee County

Will close early at noon

Lexington County

Open

Newberry County

Open

Richland County

Open

Saluda County

Closed

Sumter County

Open

Orangeburg County

Closed

The City of West Columbia also announced some closures within the city.

The City Hall will close on Tuesday at 10 a.m.

Officials also said the West Columbia Regular January 2024 City Council Meeting scheduled for Tuesday is canceled.

South Carolina Chief Justice Donald Beatty sent out a Severe Weather Memorandum for state courts, advising all state judicial officers and employees to follow the decisions made by their respective county government officials regarding office delays or closings.

The Memorandum also stated judges assigned to counties operating as normal should be flexible in granting continuances to attorneys and parties who experience personal issues caused by the weather conditions that prevent their appearance in court.

“Chief judges for administrative purposes at all levels may direct that certain matters or proceedings go forward despite the closure or delay, and shall ensure that bond hearings continue to be conducted at least once a day if conditions are safe to do so,” the memorandum stared.

For more information, click here.

To find school closures, click here.

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Prepare for Severe Weather Tuesday

South Carolina residents should prepare for severe weather expected to impact the state Tuesday. As of this morning, Forecasters with the National Weather Service predict widespread damaging winds and the possibility of tornados, heavy rains and flash flooding, with the most severe storm conditions likely tomorrow afternoon.Residents should take immediate safety precautions if they receive an emergency alert or are advised to do so by local public safety officials.Before the storm, double-check emergency plans, including:...

South Carolina residents should prepare for severe weather expected to impact the state Tuesday. As of this morning, Forecasters with the National Weather Service predict widespread damaging winds and the possibility of tornados, heavy rains and flash flooding, with the most severe storm conditions likely tomorrow afternoon.

Residents should take immediate safety precautions if they receive an emergency alert or are advised to do so by local public safety officials.

Before the storm, double-check emergency plans, including:

-Review Your Emergency Kit: Prepare an emergency kit with non-perishable food, water, medications, flashlights, batteries, and a first-aid kit. Make sure your cell phone and other devices are charged in case of power outages.

-Secure Outdoor Items: Be sure to clean up any items in your yard that may become dangerous projectiles due to high winds. This includes outdoor furniture, garden tools, decorations, and toys.

-Stay Informed: Check local weather forecasts for information specific to your area and stay informed about storm developments. Have multiple ways to get emergency information.

-Turn Around Don't Drown: Heavy rain can lead to flash flooding, especially in low-lying areas. NEVER drive through flooded roadways. Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.

-If a Tornado Warning is issued for your area, get indoors to a pre-designated area such as an interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway, central bathroom with no windows) away from corners, windows, doors, and outside walls.

- If you're in a vehicle, trailer, or mobile home, get out immediately and go to the lowest floor of a sturdy, nearby building, or storm shelter.

- If you cannot get indoors, lie flat in a nearby ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands. Be aware of potential flooding and flying debris.

- Remember, straight-line winds can be just as damaging as a tornado.

As conditions change, stay up-to-date with the latest weather forecasts from the National Weather Service and local meteorologists. They will give you the best local information about the timing of the storm and conditions in specific areas.

What to do during severe weather: https://scemd.org/prepare/types-of-disasters/thunderstorms/

Before, During and After a Tornado: https://scemd.org/prepare/types-of-disasters/tornadoes/

Flood Safety: https://scemd.org/prepare/types-of-disasters/floods/

South Carolina Emergency Management Division

Severe thunderstorms moving through, tornado watch issued for the entire Midlands

The Storm Prediction Center has most of the state under an enhanced risk of severe weather today.Credit: WLTXCOLUMBIA, S.C. — A tornado watch has been issued for the entire Midlands of South Carolina as the area is seeing severe weather that could bring some hazards to the region.The watch is in effect until 6 p.m. and includes all of the Midlands, which are these counties: Calhoun, Clarendon, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lee, Lexington, Newberry, Or...

The Storm Prediction Center has most of the state under an enhanced risk of severe weather today.

Credit: WLTX

COLUMBIA, S.C. — A tornado watch has been issued for the entire Midlands of South Carolina as the area is seeing severe weather that could bring some hazards to the region.

The watch is in effect until 6 p.m. and includes all of the Midlands, which are these counties: Calhoun, Clarendon, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lee, Lexington, Newberry, Orangeburg, Richland, Saluda, and Sumter.

To be clear, a watch means conditions are favorable for a tornado to form. A warning would be issued if a tornado is spotted by someone on the ground or is indicated on radar.

Already severe severe thunderstorm warnings have been issued, and more are expected as we go through the next several hours.

During the day, there will be a growing risk of severe weather as we go into and through the afternoon. Showers have already begun and there is a chance of severe thunderstorms, including heavy rainfall. High winds are expected, even without the thunderstorms.

A wind advisory is in effect until 10 p.m. for all of the Midlands and most of South Carolina. Gusty winds will blow around unsecured objects. The strong winds may cause some power outages and blow down tree limbs. Driving in such strong winds can be challenging, particularly for vehicles with a high profile. Use extra caution if you are going to be travelling today.

Credit: WLTX

The cold front will cross the forecast area this afternoon and into early this evening as the storm system moves from southwest Missouri this morning into the eastern Great Lakes. There are still a lot of worries, the most important of which is the risk of tornadoes and strong to severe thunderstorms.

The Storm Prediction Center has most of the Midlands under an enhanced risk of severe weather today. Out of the five risk categories used by the center, this one is the third highest risk. Localized flooding may result from some of the thunderstorms, but because the storms will be moving quickly, the threat of flooding seems low.

Credit: WLTX

Warm air will be surging north as the winds pick up out of the south. High temperatures today will be in the middle to upper 60s, even with the clouds and rain.

The threat of severe weather will exit the Midlands by the late afternoon and early evening hours. Skies will be partly cloudy tonight, with lows in the middle to upper 30s.

Our weather will improve on Wednesday. It will still be breezy at times. High temperatures will be in the lower 50s.

Storms move into the Midlands. The chance of severe weather begins in the eastern half of the viewing area.

Credit: WLTX

Storms continue to move through the state. The chance of severe weather will shift eastward, along and ahead of the line of storms.

Credit: WLTX

Storms continue to move through the state. The chance of severe weather will shift along and near I-26 and I-77, ahead of the line of storms.

Credit: WLTX

Storms continue to move through the state. The chance of severe weather will shift along and near I-95, ahead of the line of storms.

Credit: WLTX

The storms will be near the coast. The chance of severe weather will be out of the Midlands. Our weather will improve this evening and tonight.

Timing: When we can expect severe weather to move through the area

The Storm Prediction Center has most of the Midlands under an elevated risk of severe weather on Tuesday.Credit: WLTXCOLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina is expected to see severe weather Tuesday, including potentially high winds that could lead to power outages and some damage.Showers and storms are expected Tuesday, carrying with it a potential for heavy rainfall and damaging winds and even tornadoes. Already all public school districts in the Mid...

The Storm Prediction Center has most of the Midlands under an elevated risk of severe weather on Tuesday.

Credit: WLTX

COLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina is expected to see severe weather Tuesday, including potentially high winds that could lead to power outages and some damage.

Showers and storms are expected Tuesday, carrying with it a potential for heavy rainfall and damaging winds and even tornadoes. Already all public school districts in the Midlands have switched to e-learning for the day and many other events are canceled due to the chance for rough weather in the afternoon and early evening.

RELATED: Most Midands schools move to e-learning day Tuesday due to severe weather threat

The highest potential for severe weather will be midday through Tuesday evening as a line of thunderstorms moves through the area. Damaging wind gusts and even a tornado will be possible as this line of storms pushes through South Carolina

The Storm Prediction Center has most of the Midlands under an enhanced risk of severe weather on Tuesday. This is the third highest risk category out of five that the center uses.

Credit: WLTX

Some of the thunderstorms could produce localized flooding, but the threat appears to be low because the storms will be moving quickly.

Credit: WLTX

A wind advisory is in effect from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday for the majority of South Carolina. Winds will be out of the south at 25 to 35 mph, with gusts up to 45 mph.

Strong winds on Tuesday may cause unsecured outdoor items to be scattered or blown around. There could be a few power outages and tree limbs that are blown down. Driving in such strong winds can be challenging, particularly for vehicles with a high profile. Use extra caution if you are going to be travelling.

Credit: WLTX

Storms start to develop by midday. The storms will be moving quickly from west to east. Severe weather will be possible.

Credit: WLTX

The storms will continue to move from west to east. Severe weather will be possible along and east of I-26 at this point. The severe weather threat will end in the western part of South Carolina.

Most of the shower and thunderstorm activity will be outside of the Midlands. The severe weather threat will be over. It will continue to be a bit windy at times.

South Carolina city's downtown heavily damaged by apparent tornado

Images from Bamberg appear to show significant damage in the downtown area.BAMBERG COUNTY, S.C. — The National Weather Service is investigating reports of tornado damage in South Carolina, including an apparent tornado in Bamberg and a possible tornado near Irmo.A series of severe thunde...

Images from Bamberg appear to show significant damage in the downtown area.

BAMBERG COUNTY, S.C. — The National Weather Service is investigating reports of tornado damage in South Carolina, including an apparent tornado in Bamberg and a possible tornado near Irmo.

A series of severe thunderstorms moved through the region Tuesday leaving behind heavy rain, winds, and damage. Multiple areas reported trees down. While there were power outages in most counties, they were spotty, affecting some areas but not others in the same region.

The worst damage near the Midlands appears to be in the town of Bamberg, where an apparent tornado touched down near the downtown area. Multiple photos posted online by law enforcement and citizens show significant damage to at least two buildings in downtown, with bricks strewn across the main road in the town. At the headquarters of Edisto Electric Cooperative on the edge of town, they reported that they experienced a tornado and posted multiple photos of damage to what appears to be a warehouse.

South Carolina House Representative Justin Bamberg, who's from the Bamberg area, said there were no apparent injuries. He said now the town will focus on rebuilding.

"One of the beauties of living in a small town when things like this happen is your going to see people with their trucks and gloves, chainsaws, and we're going to get through it," Bamberg said.

A tornado warning had been issued for that area earlier in the afternoon.

The National Weather Service has not officially confirmed that the damage is from a tornado but said they will be sending a survey team Wednesday to Bamberg.

Lexington County officials said the NWS is also sending a team to areas near Irmo and Chapin. Lexington County Emergency Services said the investigators will be going to Berl Mar Road near Lake Murray and Irmo as well as West Ridge Court in Chapin. While it's also unclear if that was a tornado, the county said multiple trees are down in that area. They also said a tree fell on an Amazon delivery truck at Old Lexington Highway and Mallard Drive in Chapin but no injuries were reported.

LIST: Midlands school districts moving to e-learning Tuesday due to severe weather

The National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center has put the entire Midlands under an "enhanced" risk for severe weather.COLUMBIA, S.C. — Some school districts in the Midlands of South Carolina are making changes to their schedules due to the threat of severe weather that will be happening Tuesday.The National W...

The National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center has put the entire Midlands under an "enhanced" risk for severe weather.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Some school districts in the Midlands of South Carolina are making changes to their schedules due to the threat of severe weather that will be happening Tuesday.

The National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center has put the entire Midlands under an "enhanced" risk for severe weather, Enhanced is the third highest level and means we're more likely to face a threat of hazardous conditions. The greatest risk will be from roughly noon until 6 p.m. Tuesday.

In response, some school districts are beginning to alter their schedule, with some moving to e-learning days, which would mean students would stay home. Here's the list of districts News19 has heard from so far. We will update this list as more schools announce their plans:

Calhoun County School District: Calhoun County Public Schools will have an eLearning day tomorrow, January 9, 2024 due to the weather. Staff will report to work on Wednesday, January 10, 2024 at 9:00 a.m. and students will report at 10:00 a.m.

Clarendon County School District: Clarendon County School District will shift to e-learning on Tuesday, January 9th. All school activities and parent/teacher conferences have been canceled.

Students will have assignments in Google Classroom and must adhere to the District’s e-Learning Expectations listed below and on our district website under documents at ClarendonCSD.org. CCSD e-Learning Expectations

Fairfield County School District: Fairfield County School District will have an E-Learning Day Tuesday, January 9th.

Kershaw County School District: All Kershaw County School District schools will shift to e-learning on Tuesday, January 9. Teachers will post assignments in Canvas (or provide paper packets). Specific instructions will be communicated to students and parents from teachers and schools.

Lee County Schools: Tuesday, January 9, 2024 will be designated as an e-Learning day for students and staff members in the district. Moreover, all afterschool programs, fieldtrips and extracurricular activities we will be canceled as well.

Lexington District One: All Lexington One schools will shift to e-learning on Tuesday, Jan. 9. That means the school buildings and offices will close Tuesday, with teachers assigning both virtual instruction and/or take-home lessons. All afterschool activities and sports are canceled for Tuesday, Jan. 9. Please check your email or ParentSquare for more information.

Lexington District Two: Lexington Two schools will move to an eLearning day on Tuesday, January 9. All afternoon and evening activities are canceled for Tuesday, including athletic events, extracurricular activities, after-school programs and adult education classes.

Lexington District Three: Tuesday, January 9th will be an eLearning Day for all students and staff members across the district due to the potential for high winds and severe weather resulting from a strong storm system that is moving into the area.

Lexington District Four: Lexington Four will transition to an eLearning day for all schools, Tuesday, January 9, 2024.

Lexington-Richland District Five: Lexington-Richland School District Five schools, including our virtual FIVE program, will transition to an e-learning day on Tuesday, January 9, 2024. Teachers will post assignments to Google Classroom or Seesaw accounts by 10:00 a.m. Tuesday morning for asynchronous learning.

All afterschool programs and athletic events on Tuesday, January 9, 2024, are canceled or will be rescheduled as appropriate.

Newberry County School District: Tuesday, January 9, 2024, all schools and offices will be closed, with students and staff participating in eLearning. Teachers will post assignments for students to complete, but there will be no live Google Meets on this day. Students who do not have internet access will need to download assignments prior to leaving school on Monday, January 8, 2024. Students will have a five-school-day window of time to turn in eLearning assignments.

Orangeburg County Schools: The district will be moving to eLearning and remote work on Tuesday for students, faculty and staff. All school and district buildings will be closed on Tuesday, January 9, 2024. Also, all afterschool programs and athletic events, including practices and games, will be canceled on Tuesday, January 9, 2024.

Due to the risk of fallen power lines and trees, OCSD will open with a two-hour delay on Wednesday, January 10, 2024 to allow staff to safely access potential damage and keep the safety of drivers, faculty and staff at the forefront.

Richland District One - Tuesday (January 9, 2024) will be an e-learning day for Richland One students and a work-from-home day for Richland One employees. Richland One parents may pick up meals (breakfast and lunch) for their children from 8-10 a.m. Tuesday at one of the following locations: Lower Richland High School (2615 Lower Richland Boulevard, Hopkins, SC 29061); St. Andrews Middle School (1231 Bluefield Road, Columbia, SC 29210); or the Richland One Central Kitchen (1224 Whitney Street, Columbia, SC 29201).

Richland District Two: Richland School District Two will switch to an e-learning/remote work day on Tuesday, January 9, 2024, This means all school buildings and district facilities will be closed and all after-school activities are canceled. As an e-learning district, approved by the S.C. Department of Education, Richland Two will provide asynchronous instruction to students. Teachers will post assignments in Google Classroom (or provide paper packets). Specific instructions, including teacher virtual office hours, will be communicated to students and parents from their teachers and schools. All assignments must be completed and turned in by Friday, January 12, 2024, for the student to be marked present for Tuesday, January 9, 2024.

Saluda County School District: Saluda County Schools will operate on an eLearning day on Tuesday, January 9, 2024 due to the potential of wind gusts of 45-50 miles per hour, severe thunderstorms, localized flash flooding, and possibly tornado activity. All sporting/school events and practices are canceled also. All schools and offices are closed tomorrow.

Las escuelas del condado de Saluda operarán en un día de aprendizaje electrónico el martes 9 de enero de 2024 debido a la posibilidad de ráfagas de viento de 45 a 50 millas por hora, tormentas eléctricas severas, inundaciones repentinas localizadas y posiblemente actividad de tornados. Todos los eventos y prácticas deportivas/escolares también se cancelan. Todas las escuelas y oficinas estarán cerradas mañana.

Sumter County School District: Tuesday, January 9, 2024, will be an eLearning day for all students and staff in Sumter School District. This means schools and office buildings will be closed, and all activities, including athletic events and field trips, are canceled. Because we are an approved eLearning district, this day will not have to be made up, and lessons and assignments will be posted in Schoology.

Columbia residents react to new pickleball location planned near the Saluda River

Developers are looking to put a beer garden and pickleball court facility near the Riverbanks Zoo and the Saluda Riverwalk.COLUMBIA, S.C. — A proposed pickleball center known as PickleGarden, which could be built near the Saluda River in Columbia, is receiving attention from residents.The joys of pickleball are simple for Cricket Huff: community, physical a...

Developers are looking to put a beer garden and pickleball court facility near the Riverbanks Zoo and the Saluda Riverwalk.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — A proposed pickleball center known as PickleGarden, which could be built near the Saluda River in Columbia, is receiving attention from residents.

The joys of pickleball are simple for Cricket Huff: community, physical activity, and accessibility.

"It doesn't matter what level you are, all levels can play," she said.

They're the reasons why she and her husband, Randy, have been playing for over four years each. However, they say they've struggled to find courts in downtown Columbia.

"All the courts are in Cayce, Lexington, West Columbia, all around Columbia," Randy said.

According to Tre Bray, the cofounder of 'PickleGarden,' that's part of the reason he and his business partner chose to begin development on a brand new pickleball center. He said the facility would be next to the Saluda Riverwalk and include a beer garden with food.

"There's five or six kind of container, micro restaurants, so there's a good food court or lot for you," he said. "Six pickleball courts in a row, and you'd be walking a 12-foot wide walkway between that set of courts and the set of courts that would be below you, a step or two below you. So the idea is that you could have like a bar top across those fences."

Randy Huff said the idea is an exciting one. "It's good to see new courts coming in the Columbia area because it's the fastest-growing sport in America," he said.

The pickleball court is also receiving some criticism from residents in Columbia. Lee Kelly, a lifelong Midlands resident, said he is worried about what development might do to the wildlife along the Saluda.

"I think this is a really nice landmark for conservation so I personally just think it's a shame because from what I see from the plans on their website they're cutting through the habitat corridor, and that could affect the ecosystem there, isolating one side from the other," he said

Bray said the environmental impact is top of mind for him and developers.

"We have no intent of coming in and clear cutting, we have intent on having only native plants, having as much sustainable building practices and materials as possible," he said.

Bray said he wants the space to bring people closer to nature and closer to the community. "We want to get those people out of that unhealthy environment and into this spot where they can socialize with people, they can be connected to the environment," he said.

He said their next step is to work with engineering firms to finalize blueprints and work with the city for licensing.

Inclement weather expected Tuesday for most of South Carolina, all of the Midlands

Windy conditions will begin late morning and continue through the evening. Power outages are a possibility, not only in the Midlands but throughout the state.COLUMBIA, S.C. — A strong weather complex could have significant impacts on the Gulf States on Monday and then the Atlantic Southeast on Tuesday. Inclement weather is expected for most of South Carolina and all of the Midlands.The Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma has issued up to an...

Windy conditions will begin late morning and continue through the evening. Power outages are a possibility, not only in the Midlands but throughout the state.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — A strong weather complex could have significant impacts on the Gulf States on Monday and then the Atlantic Southeast on Tuesday. Inclement weather is expected for most of South Carolina and all of the Midlands.

The Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma has issued up to an ENHANCED RISK for severe weather for both Monday and Tuesday.

This mid-winter severe weather complex will develop in the Southern Plains on Sunday overnight. It could quickly develop into a potential severe thunderstorm and tornadic outbreak in the central Gulf states, particularly coastal Louisiana, Mississippi and the western Florida Panhandle on Monday midday, lasting through the last evening.

By Tuesday, the threat moves into the Atlantic Southeast. Early in the day Tuesday, Alabama, Georgia and Florida, where there still is a possibility of both severe thunderstorms and tornado warnings.

Credit: WLTX

South Carolina will have rainfall begin before daybreak. Rainfall intensity and gusty winds will increase throughout the morning. Although the tornado risk is low, it isn't a zero chance for the Palmetto State during the latter half of the day and into the evening.

WATCH: South Carolina Weather Radar

There will likely be sustained winds to 35 mph and gusts to 50 mph. Should severe thunderstorm warnings be issued by the National Weather Service, the greatest threat would be wind gusts exceeding 58 mph. Windy conditions will begin late morning and continue through the evening. Power outages are a possibility, not only in the Midlands but throughout the state.

Credit: WLTX

Timing for the inclement weather to impact anywhere in the Midlands would range from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. The greatest risk timeframe would be 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Impact timing may shift earlier or later, but confidence for the Tuesday inclement weather continues to increase.

Plan accordingly. It is strongly advised to be weather aware on Tuesday throughout the day. The News19 Weather Team will continue to track the potential for inclement weather Monday night through Tuesday morning and will give vital updates on the Midlands impacts all day and night.

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