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Protecting your family, in our Hometown, for a LIFETIME!

roofer in Mcclellanville, SC

Have you ever taken a second to really think about how important your home's roof is to your health and safety? It's so much more than a simple hat for your house. It protects you from the elements like rain, sleet, snow, and wind. It helps keep you and your family warm in the winter and cool in the summer. Those harmful pests and critters you see roaming around your property? Your roof helps keep them away from your family, too.

When you take those points into account, it becomes clear that your home's roof is crucial for year-round well-being and comfort. So, when your roof is nearing the end of its life, or it needs maintenance or repairs, hiring a reliable roofer in Mcclellanville, SC is an investment you shouldn't pass up. For South Carolina homeowners and business owners, only the best and brightest roofing experts will do when it comes to their family's happiness and safety. That's why they call on Hometown Roofing to handle all their repair, replacement, and maintenance needs.

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The Hometown Roofing Difference

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Hometown Roofing has been the top choice for roofing services in South Carolina for years. As locals of the Lowcountry, we pride ourselves on being more than just a roofing company. We're your friends and neighbors. As a family-owned business, integrity, hard work, and personalized service are at the forefront of our values. We believe in providing our loyal customers with the highest quality work completed by experts in their respective fields. Why? Because that's the way we would want to be treated, too.

At the end of the day, we strive to treat our customers with respect, confidence, and understanding. Our goal isn't to rip you off or charge you an arm and a leg for our residential or commercial roofing services. As an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, our goal is to work hard and provide you with a long-lasting product that you will love for years to come. It's really that simple. When you choose Hometown Roofing, you can rest assured that you'll get the highest quality roofing services in South Carolina, such as:

  • Roof Repair in Mcclellanville, SC
  • Roof Replacement Services
  • Roof Maintenance Services
  • Emergency Roofing Services
  • Roof Inspection Services
  • Commercial Roofing Services
Roofer Mcclellanville, SC

The Hometown Roofing Process

Whether you're in need of a complete roof replacement in Mcclellanville, SC, or minor roof maintenance, our process starts with an in-depth consultation and ends with a smile on our face.

Consultation

Consultation

At the consultation stage, we have a meeting with the client to talk about their roofing needs and evaluate the property. Based on our expertise, we provide recommendations to ensure the best solution for the client's specific roof replacement, repair, or maintenance requirements.

Detailed Proposal

Detailed Proposal

In the detailed proposal stage, we create a comprehensive document that outlines the scope of work relating to your roofing project, the materials to be used, project timeline, and estimated costs. This provides the client with a clear understanding of the roofing project, enabling them to make informed decisions.

Project Installation

Project Installation

During the project installation phase, our team of licensed experts executes the previously agreed-upon plan. We install or repair the roofing system with unmatched confidence and experience while always adhering to industry standards, safety protocols, and local laws. During this process, we strive to stay in touch every step of the way so our clients are always in the loop. We then complete your roofing project within the specified timeline so that clients experience minimal disruptions to their daily lives.

Final Inspection

Final Inspection

When it's time for the final inspection of your roofing project, our roofing contractor's work is thoroughly examined to ensure it meets our high standards and our client's roofing needs. If there is additional work to be done, we'll finish up the project ASAP. If our client has questions or concerns, we always address them before heading home. That way, our customers can rest easy at night knowing they have a reliable, well-maintained roof over their heads.

Protect Your Home or Business with Roof Repair in Mcclellanville, SC

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Living in South Carolina means experiencing unpredictable weather patterns. Bright and sunny skies can quickly turn into heavy rainfall, which can cause damage to your roof. That's why it's important to have a reliable roofing company to perform expert repairs when needed.

Whether you suspect damage has been done to your roof or you want preventative maintenance, Hometown Roofing is here to handle the hard work for you. A thorough roof inspection is the first step in understanding your repair needs. Our team will then repair any damage, like weather-worn shingles or roof leaks, to ensure your family is safe and protected.

Some of the most common roof repairs we provide for homeowners and business owners include the following:

  • Torn or Damaged Shingle Repair and Replacement
  • Tile or Shingle Replacement
  • Roof Shrinkage Issues
  • Roofing Leaks
  • Ventilation Issues
  • Pooling or Standing Water
  • Storm Damage Repair
  • Damaged Gutter Repair
  • Roof Flashing Repair
  • Much More
 Roof Repair Mcclellanville, SC

Don't wait until it's too late to schedule repairs - your roof might only be one or two South Carolina storms away from needing more than simple maintenance or repairs! South Carolina homeowners and entrepreneurs trust Hometown Roofing for their roof repairs because we:

Prioritize Safety

We put a lot of stock in the ethos of "Safety first before everything." As licensed contractors with years of experience, our roofers have the tools and training to repair your roof without you needing to worry about their safety. Of course, your safety is of utmost importance, too. Hiring an experienced professional saves you from putting yourself and your family in a compromising situation that could involve hospitals, doctors, and injuries.

Because the truth is, roof repairs usually require climbing ladders, balancing on high roofs, and working under pressure. Those aren't things an average homeowner looks forward to. By working with Hometown Roofing, you're leaving the difficult work up to highly trained experts, so you can focus on your family, not recovering from an injury sustained from DIY roofing.

Have Extensive Roofing Experience

You can tell whether a roofer is worth hiring by asking them about their roofing experience. The very best roofers usually have years, if not decades, of professional experience. Those years working up on roofs out in the sun is priceless for homeowners and business owners who want the best roofing service. At Hometown Roofing, our contractors have extensive knowledge and experience, both in advanced applications and basic roof repair theory. Unlike some roofers, Hometown Roofing team members have real-world experience and certifications - something that no amount of reading or watching YouTube videos will provide.

Maintain Warranties on Roofing Products

As a homeowner or business owner, you want every assurance that your new roof or roofing products will last for the long haul. That's why we're proud to provide a 50-year manufacturer warranty and a 20-year labor warranty on all new asphalt architectural shingle roofs. We also provide a 20-year labor warranty on all new standing seam metal roofs and a 10-year labor warranty on new tuff-rib metal roofs.

Provide High-Quality Roofing Craftsmanship

Our team at Hometown Roofing is dedicated to delivering exceptional roof repairs and top-notch service. We take pride in our work and strive for excellence when repairing, replacing, or installing roofs in South Carolina. We understand that even the smallest details matter, which is why we thoroughly inspect our work to ensure the highest quality. Our main objective is to surpass your expectations with true roofing expertise, not just average service. For long-lasting roof repairs, trust the professionals at Hometown Roofing.

 Roof Replacement Mcclellanville, SC

Reliable Roof Replacement in Mcclellanville, SC

When it comes to getting a new roof for your home, you want to make sure it's done right. That's why you need licensed professionals to handle the complex and intensive process. It may seem like a big investment, but the long-term benefits are worth it. You'll enjoy increased safety, comfort, and a higher home value. At Hometown Roofing, we're the go-to company for roof installations in South Carolina.

Our experts have completed hundreds of successful projects, and we hold ourselves to the highest standards for product longevity, customer satisfaction, and quality craftsmanship. Whether you're looking to upgrade your roof or need a replacement due to damage, we've got you covered. We specialize in many types of roof replacement projects, including:

  • Asphalt Roofs - Cost Effective, Popular, Versatile, and Appealing
  • Metal Roofs - Long Lasting, Low Maintenance, Energy Efficient, Superior Protection
  • Commercial Flat Top and TPO Roofs - Durable, Energy Efficient, UV and Chemical Resistant, Purpose Built for Your Business

When Is It Time to Replace Your Roof?

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At Hometown Roofing, one of the most common questions we get is, "How do I know when it's time to replace my roof?" That's not always an easy question to answer since every roofing structure and every roof replacement scenario is slightly different. Roofs endure harsh weather conditions like extreme heat, strong winds, freezing temperatures, and heavy rainfall, which can damage their protective layers. Although some roofs can last up to 25 years, shingles and other materials may deteriorate over time and become brittle, crack, tear, or disintegrate. While it can be challenging to assess the condition of your roof from the ground, these signs may help you determine when it's time for roof replacement in Mcclellanville, SC.

Begin Looking Indoors

It might seem counterintuitive to look for signs of disrepair inside your home, but rooms like your attic can show signs of damage much better than outside areas. Be sure to grab a powerful flashlight first and look carefully for streaks, stains, and drips. Also, keep an eye out for light beams poking through the top of your house. If you see these signs, there's a good chance your roof has leaks and should be replaced.

Cupped, Clawed, or Curled Shingles

You'll need a good view of your roof to check for these red flags, which are telltale signs that your roof is near the end of its life. Curling and cupping look alike and manifest with the ends of your shingles peeling away and pointing up. Clawing happens when the middle of a shingle lifts up while its ends stay attached to the roof. None of these conditions are good, so if you spot them, know that it could be time for a roof inspection.

Age of Your Roof

How old is your roof? If it's more than 25 years old, chances are it's on its way out. The average lifespan of an asphalt roof is 20-25 years. When that time frame passes, you should consider looking at replacing your worn-out roof.

Friends in Your Neighborhood are Replacing Roofs

If you're driving around your neighborhood and notice one or more roofers in Mcclellanville, SC, make a mental note to inspect your roof. It's common for houses in neighborhoods to be constructed at the same time, with the same materials purchased in bulk by the builder. As a result, the roofs of these homes tend to deteriorate at a similar rate. With that in mind, if you observe your neighbors replacing their roofs, it may be a sign that you should consider doing the same.

Your Roof is Sagging

A sagging roof is a sign of structural problems and may require a new roof installation. This problem is typically caused by water damage or a broken rafter, and it's important to have a licensed and insured roofing company, like Hometown Roofing, address the issue. To properly diagnose the problem, the contractor may need to remove the shingles and plywood sheathing underneath.

Roofer Mcclellanville, SC
 Roof Repair Mcclellanville, SC

Emergency Roof Repair in Mcclellanville, SC

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Hometown Roofing is available to assist when disaster strikes. We recognize that roofing emergencies can occur at any time, so we provide 24/7 emergency roofing services to homeowners in our community. Here is an overview of the critical emergency services we offer:

Available 24/7
Available 24/7

When you're in a roofing emergency, Hometown Roofing is always here to help. Our expert team is available 24/7 to respond quickly and professionally to any crisis. We understand that your home's safety is your top priority, and we're committed to mitigating damage and providing peace of mind during difficult times.

Help with Insurance Claims
Help with Insurance Claims

Dealing with insurance claims can be overwhelming, especially after a disaster. That's why Hometown Roofing offers assistance navigating the complicated process of working with your insurance company. We'll help you document the damage and submit the necessary paperwork to your insurance provider, ensuring a smoother and more successful claim.

Emergency Roof Tarping
Emergency Roof Tarping

If your roof has suffered severe damage and can't be repaired immediately, our emergency tarping service can provide temporary protection from further harm. This solution will safeguard your home from the elements until repairs can be made. Trust Hometown Roofing to keep your home safe and secure in any roofing emergency.

Storm Damage Repair
Storm Damage Repair

When severe weather hits, your roof can take a beating. From losing shingles to damaging the structure, it can leave your home vulnerable. That's where Hometown Roofing comes in. We offer quick and reliable storm damage repair services to ensure your roof is safe and secure once again.

Stabilize Your Home's Structure
Stabilize Your Home's Structure

If your roof has been severely damaged by a fallen tree or other catastrophic event, call Hometown Roofing ASAP. Our team is here to help. We'll stabilize your roof, preventing any potential collapse or further damage, helping provide peace of mind and comfort in a trying time.

Remove Debris
Remove Debris

After a storm, your roof can be covered in debris that may cause additional damage if left unattended. Our experienced professionals are equipped to safely remove any debris, ultimately preserving the lifespan of your roof.

Temporary Roof Repair in Mcclellanville, SC
Temporary Roof Repair in Mcclellanville, SC

Sometimes, extensive repairs to your roof can't be completed immediately after an emergency. Our team of roofing experts can provide a temporary fix so that your home is safe, dry, and protected from more damage.

Repairs for Emergency Leaks
Repairs for Emergency Leaks

When your roof sprouts a leak suddenly, it can be catastrophic. Hometown Roofing professionals will locate the source of your leak and provide a quick, effective solution to your problem.

Emergency Roof Inspections
Emergency Roof Inspections

When a severe weather event or other emergency incident occurs, you may need a roof inspection to assess the totality of your damage. Hometown Roofing inspections identify needed repairs. That way, you plan for the next steps and do what's necessary to protect your roof and your family.

Hometown Roofing: South Carolina's Premier Choice for Quality Roofing Services

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Hometown Roofing was born out of a rich legacy and a steadfast commitment to quality. Unlike many roofing companies in South Carolina, we stand by the ethos of doing everything right and never cutting corners. We extend that commitment to your home, whether you need minor roof repairs, a total roof replacement, or something in between. Contact our office to schedule your initial consultation today.

 Roof Replacement Mcclellanville, SC

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132 E 2nd N St, Summerville, SC 29483

Latest News in Mcclellanville, SC

Editorial: A sand mine near this elementary school still makes no sense

Last fall, we urged Charleston County zoning officials not to allow a new sand mine operation on 20 acres next door to the St. James Santee Elementary-Middle School, and our call — along with the voices of several school officials and neighbors — was heard when the county deferred the request. Now that the proposal has returned in a slightly improved but still potentially harmful form, we repeat our request to reject the mining operation and urge others to do the same.We also repeat our call to state regulators to step up ...

Last fall, we urged Charleston County zoning officials not to allow a new sand mine operation on 20 acres next door to the St. James Santee Elementary-Middle School, and our call — along with the voices of several school officials and neighbors — was heard when the county deferred the request. Now that the proposal has returned in a slightly improved but still potentially harmful form, we repeat our request to reject the mining operation and urge others to do the same.

We also repeat our call to state regulators to step up efforts to bring South Carolina’s outdated mining laws up to date. This proposed sand mine is but one of many such operations that have triggered serious concerns about their impact on neighbors’ health and quality of life.

Charleston County’s Board of Zoning Appeals will meet at 4:30 p.m. Monday to consider a special exception for the sand mine off U.S. Highway 17 on a wooded tract just across Lofton Road from the St. James Santee school. While the request has been changed so that sand-laden dump trucks no longer would access U.S. 17 via Lofton, the operation still would create noise, vibration, dust and other problems for the school, which sits less than 1,000 feet away.

About 20 trucks are expected to come and go daily from the mining site, which is also about a half mile from the Francis Marion National Forest.

The county’s own analysis has suggested the mining site could mar land with soil types that the U.S. Department of Agriculture considers the best for agricultural production. The county’s comprehensive plan notes that “Designation of farmland preservation areas recognizes the importance of preserving Charleston County’s farming resources, including individual farms and areas of productive soils, as well as a way of life valued by the community,” and county staff says this mining use may not be consistent with the plan. The staff also notes its proximity to the school may make the mine harmful to the welfare and character of the immediate community.

The Coastal Conservation League’s Riley Egger tells us that while the new access road is a positive concession, “it does not alleviate our concern about the appropriateness of the mine site.” We urge others with similar concerns to email them to [email protected] by noon Friday.

The looming controversy over a sand mine on Lofton Road points to a greater challenge that South Carolina must still grapple with: updating its mining law and regulations to make them appropriate for the 21st century, particularly as once-rural parts of our state are developing or being valued as conserved parks and lands. There are places where new mines are appropriate, but there are also places — such as neighborhoods, schools and public lands — that need to be protected from these new light industrial operations opening up next door. Our state isn’t the same largely rural place it was in the 1970s, when the current regulatory playing field for mining operations was designed.

The state Department of Health and Environmental Control has recently worked with a newly formed Mining Task Force, which includes mining companies and conservationists. We urge all involved to get back to the table and produce recommendations that lawmakers can consider next year. Our coastal communities are seeing how a growing demand for sand and fill leads to dusty highways, unwelcome discharges, blight and a scarred landscape with ponds of limited use. Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties alone have had about 100 active sand mining operations in recent years.

Rejecting the Lofton Road sand mining proposal would be an important step to protect the St. James Santee Elementary and Middle School, but until the state updates its outdated mining law, such zoning controversies will continue to take up more of our time that could better be spent somewhere else.

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A unique getaway: Kayaking the Lowcountry wilderness of Wambaw Creek offers solitude

The quiet black water slips beneath your kayak. Sunlight plays on the surface of the water, filtered through the leaves of tupelo and tall bald cypress trees — some hundreds of years old.The only sounds you hear are the gurgle of the water around your paddle, and the occasional chatter of a woodpecker darting among the trees. The water swirls nearby and an alligator slips into the channel in front of you and then silently disappears, like a prehistoric submarine, only to resurface far behind you where he observes you with a wary...

The quiet black water slips beneath your kayak. Sunlight plays on the surface of the water, filtered through the leaves of tupelo and tall bald cypress trees — some hundreds of years old.

The only sounds you hear are the gurgle of the water around your paddle, and the occasional chatter of a woodpecker darting among the trees. The water swirls nearby and an alligator slips into the channel in front of you and then silently disappears, like a prehistoric submarine, only to resurface far behind you where he observes you with a wary eye.

You see other eyes, too. High in the trees you spot a barred owl, sitting on a limb and surveying her domain. The night hunter is a statue of feathers and could be carved from the wood of the tree, except that her eyes follow you as you paddle by. When you are alone in the wilderness, you are never truly alone.

The wilderness you are exploring is the Wambaw Creek Wilderness Area near McClellanville, and even a short visit to this mysterious, beautiful place is an unforgettable experience.

Named one of the “14 best places to canoe and kayak on national forests” by the National Forest Foundation, Wambaw Creek is a popular destination for outdoor explorers. It rises from the swamps between Charleston and the mighty Santee River. It snakes its way on a northeasterly track for about 10 miles from such colorfully-named watersheds like “Hell Hole Swamp” and forms a watery path through the heart of the Francis Marion National Forest.

The region is steeped in history, from the earliest colonial days and Huguenot settlements, to prosperous rice plantations that made men wealthy along its banks — while enslaving others. Numerous battles were fought in the Wambaw Swamps, where Gen. Francis Marion, the cunning “Swamp Fox,” outwitted the British or waylaid them in hit-and-run battles that earned him fame, and our nation its independence.

Wambaw Creek today is an untouched preserve that bears little mark of its historic past. Massive cypress trees stretch into the sky, and well-tended forest service roads take visitors to two well-maintained boat landings to provide easy access. A popular kayak and canoe trail along the Wambaw is 4.6 miles from Still Landing to the bridge at Elmwood Recreation area. This makes for an easy 2- to 4-hour paddle that is excellent for all skill levels. If you have more time and a desire to explore, you can paddle upstream from Still Landing before turning around for a descent of the creek to the takeout. This makes for about a 7- to 9-mile trip and offers some incredible wildlife and nature-viewing opportunities.

I recently paddled Wambaw Creek with a group of friends. We launched at Still Landing and paddled upstream to explore the upper reaches of the creek. After a few hours we turned around and began our descent toward the Santee. Wambaw Creek is affected by the tides, and though our trip was easy going, we could see the effect of the water levels on the banks and in the current as we paddled.

We took out at Elmwood, recording a trip of 9 miles (including several side trips into smaller creeks), and then headed off for dinner at a local restaurant. Along the way, we stopped by the St. James-Santee Parish Episcopal Church to check out the history of the brick church built in 1768, and then enjoyed a seafood dinner at the Seewee Restaurant. This rustic, friendly diner located on U.S. 17 in Awendaw has served authentic Lowcountry seafood and other fare for nearly 25 years. It was the perfect stop after a day exploring a genuine wilderness, such as you will find at Wambaw Creek.

Wambaw Creek Wilderness Area was created in 1980 and is a Lowcountry treasure. Located a little over two hours from the Beaufort area, Wambaw Creek near McClellanville is part of the Berkeley County Blueways, and is an easy drive that provides an excellent day trip into the wild that you can tailor-make to your schedule and experience level.

Take U.S. 17 north through Charleston to McClellanville. At McClellanville, turn left onto S.C. 45. At 7.5 miles, turn right onto Forest Service Road 211. At 3.5 miles, turn left onto Forest Service Road 211B to Still Landing.

Elmwood Recreation area (suggested take-out) is located three miles further on FSR 211. This is a relatively easy paddle, but take precautions for encountering wildlife, and for exploring a wilderness area. There are stores and restaurants in nearby McClellanville, but there are no facilities at the landings.

For more information on exploring Wambaw Creek and the area, contact the U.S. Forest Service at (843) 336-2200 or visit www.berkeleyoutdoorlife.com. For information on the St. James-Santee Parish Episcopal Church, go to https://www.brickchurchstjames.org.

A day trip to historic McClellanville, SC, is a step back in time

“How long have you been in business here?” I asked the proprietor of T.W. Graham & Co., an unassuming seafood restaurant located in a historic storefront on the oak-shaded main street of the coastal village of McClellanville.“We’ve been in business since 1894” he said, and then, with a grin that made it more than an afterthought, “but I’m not the original owner.”Do tell.I was speaking with Patrick Runey, who busied himself greeting patrons and chatting with friends as t...

“How long have you been in business here?” I asked the proprietor of T.W. Graham & Co., an unassuming seafood restaurant located in a historic storefront on the oak-shaded main street of the coastal village of McClellanville.

“We’ve been in business since 1894” he said, and then, with a grin that made it more than an afterthought, “but I’m not the original owner.”

Do tell.

I was speaking with Patrick Runey, who busied himself greeting patrons and chatting with friends as the Saturday evening crowd began to gather for dinner and conversation.

T.W. Graham & Co. is a fixture in the small fishing village, and being only a stone’s throw from docks crowded with shrimp boats, it serves up an offering of fresh seafood for lunch and dinner almost daily. With my plate covered with freshly prepared shrimp, hand-shredded cole slaw, fries and hushpuppies, Patrick described how all of this came to be.

“I am from Charleston, and when the owners were looking to sell, I told them our plans and they knew we were the right buyer. They had other offers but did not want it to go to just anyone.”

Originally a general store, T.W. Graham & Co. has served the people of McClellanville in many ways during the 128 years it has sat on Pinckney Street. Today, it continues to be place where villagers and out-of-towners alike gather, and life for the little waterfront community rolls on.

McClellanville lies on the edge of a vast network of marshy creeks and rivers that stretches to the horizon, where the old lighthouse stands on the point of Cape Romain. Founded in the 1850s as a seaside escape for the swamp-haunted plantation owners of the Santee River region, the town quickly became a productive fishing village.

Today, it has become a destination for day tourists and overnight visitors who come to the little settlement between Charleston and Georgetown, with a desire to escape the ordinary and enjoy the peace and quiet of life under the live oaks.

When you visit McClellanville, you will encounter a place that is like a picture of Lowcountry days gone by. A network of quiet streets connect frame houses that range from two-story farmhouse-style to small, comfortable cottages. A dozen classic storefronts stand along Pinckney Street, where you can purchase hand-made local gifts and items of coastal decor, while being welcomed by friendly locals who are glad for your visit.

A crossroads in the center of the village is home to neighborhood churches, including the historic chapel of ease for the parish church of St. James Episcopal. The gingerbread trim reflects the 19th century Lowcountry style. Here, the congregation worships each Sunday, and also maintains the old brick church of St. James Santee near Hampton Plantation.

A drive to the end of Pinckney Street brings you to the Village Museum, a cultural center where the history of the town and region are preserved. A town dock will give you a view down Jeremy Creek to the vast marshy wilderness stretching to the Atlantic, or upstream to the spires and nets of the shrimp fleet, docked at the seafood company off Oak Street.

The boats form a backdrop for the Seaman’s Memorial, dedicated to the memory of those who lost their lives while working the coastal waters of South Carolina. It’s a reminder of the cost of braving sea and storm to bring home each day’s catch.

You can cap off your visit with a delicious meal at T.W. Graham & Co. or at one of the other great restaurants in town, local institutions like the McClellanville Diner, The Bent Rod, and Buckshots provide an array of seafood, comfort food or more adventurous fare to please any palate.

As I finished my meal and prepared to return home, I only wished that I had more time to explore and enjoy this quiet, beautiful town. Whether you stay in McClellanville for a day, or simply visit while passing through, you will feel very much at home.

McClellanville is located off US. 17 between Charleston and Georgetown.

A drive of a little over two hours will take you through Charleston and along the wide, lonely coast highway. McClellanville is located 30 miles above Charleston and just before you cross the Santee River. As you come within the town limits you will see three of the popular local restaurants, each open at various days and times to accommodate your appetite or itinerary.

To enter the village proper, take a right onto Pinckney Street, and follow its winding track into town. You will soon come to the business district where shops and T.W. Graham & Co. welcome you, or you can continue beyond to visit the museum, churches and the often-busy waterfront along Jeremy Creek.

There are many things to do and explore nearby as well. You can explore nature at Santee Coastal Reserve, discover history at Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, or arrange for an excursion by boat to visit the historic lighthouse at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge.

For more information on the town and its offerings, visit the town of McClellanville homepage at https://www.mcclellanvillesc.org or call T.W. Graham & Co. at (843) 887-4342.

A veteran says he has a service dog. McClellanville says he has a vicious one.

Is Gus a good boy?To his 79-year-old Marine veteran owner, the 130-pound German shepherd is a calming force who helps him keep his balance and live a life that feels closer to normal. To his neighbors in McClellanville, the dog is a good reason to avoid Baker Street. More than once, he has charged toward people out on walks with their dogs to attack. One man and his pet required stitches after. Another said she cracked a rib falling after Gus latched on to her small dog.Doug Holsclaw said receiving the notice in April that Gus ...

Is Gus a good boy?

To his 79-year-old Marine veteran owner, the 130-pound German shepherd is a calming force who helps him keep his balance and live a life that feels closer to normal. To his neighbors in McClellanville, the dog is a good reason to avoid Baker Street. More than once, he has charged toward people out on walks with their dogs to attack. One man and his pet required stitches after. Another said she cracked a rib falling after Gus latched on to her small dog.

Doug Holsclaw said receiving the notice in April that Gus was banned from living in town hit him almost as hard as losing his brother 42 years ago. He is suing to bring Gus home.

The case will largely boil down to which description of Holsclaw’s 5-year-old companion sticks.

Gus is a service dog. Gus is a vicious dog. He can’t be both.

McClellanville, a small fishing town of about 600 people about 40 miles north of Charleston, allows dogs to roam freely. Rutledge Leland, who has been mayor for more than 40 years, said the town’s dog laws come up in meetings nearly every year.

The town has long considered a leash law, holding referendums on the matter over the years, Leland said. But most residents remain opposed.

“We tend to be a community, we wanted people to have dogs, but obviously we don’t want them to interfere with people’s day-to-day activities,” he said.

Rutledge declined to talk about Gus because of the pending lawsuit, but said his behavior has been an ongoing problem.

“It’s just a bad situation,” he said. “We’ll try to be fair.”

After a resident asked the town to reconsider a leash law in May 2021, Cecil Mills told Town Council about his encounter with Gus as he was walking on Baker Street. Mills pursued charges. Holsclaw paid restitution and the case was ultimately dropped. Mills said he doesn’t doubt Holsclaw’s claim that he needs a service dog. But he doesn’t believe Gus qualifies, and he still doesn’t allow his grandchildren to walk in that direction because he’s afraid of what might happen if Holsclaw’s other dog got loose.

Historic McClellanville oak to be protected

An iconic McClellanville oak tree will be placed under a conservation easement and will be protected for years to come. The tree, nicknamed Deerhead Oak, sits in the center of the town. The tree earned the moniker from a keen-eyed observer who thought the knobby oak and branches resembled a deer’s head.A tire swing hangs from the branches that have welcomed visitors for years. It’s been the inspiration for artists and poets and is said to be the site of McClellanville’s first general store operated by William Peter B...

An iconic McClellanville oak tree will be placed under a conservation easement and will be protected for years to come. The tree, nicknamed Deerhead Oak, sits in the center of the town. The tree earned the moniker from a keen-eyed observer who thought the knobby oak and branches resembled a deer’s head.

A tire swing hangs from the branches that have welcomed visitors for years. It’s been the inspiration for artists and poets and is said to be the site of McClellanville’s first general store operated by William Peter Beckman in the late 1800s.

Ownership of the tree stayed within the Beckman family, spanning generations, and eventually landing in the hands of Anne Beckman Rumer. The tree was her pride and joy, her son Art Martin said.

She never had any interest in selling the property, but she didn’t want the natural beauty of the tree, which had become a sort of community hub, to go to waste either. Rumer made an agreement with the Town of McClellanville, leasing the property to the Town to use the land as a public park space.

Martin recalls making the journey from Mount Pleasant to McClellanville with his mother when he was young — a trek that felt like an eternity to a kid — to maintain the upkeep of the lawn and the tree. When Deerhead Oak earned the South Carolina Heritage Tree award in 2007, the town celebrated the recognition. It was an honor that Rumer took to heart.

“She loved McClellanville. She loved the tree. She was very, very, very proud of that being hers,” Martin said. “She couldn’t stick her chest out far enough to be so proud. Her love was that tree and that town.”

Beckman passed away in 2018 and ownership of the Deerhead Oak transferred to Martin and his sister. The Town of McClellanville had been interested in acquiring the property for years, and with help from Lowcountry Land Trust and the Charleston County Greenbelt Program, the town will be able to preserve the iconic oak tree for future generations to enjoy.

“It’s in the heart of our town. It’s comforting, I think, to residents to know that it’s always going to be there. It’s always going to be a greenspace and a symbol of our town,” said McClellanville Town Administrator Michelle McClellan.

Lowcountry Land Trust acquired the tree and the one-acre parcel of land that it sits on. The organization, which merged with East Cooper Land Trust earlier this year, will place the land under a conservation easement to protect the oak from any future development on the property. Lowcountry Land Trust plans to transfer ownership of the property to the Town of McClellanville in 2023.

“The Town, for many years, has had a lease on the property that the family was kind enough to provide. It didn’t provide the assurance that the property would never be built on and so that’s the real accomplishment,” said David Ray, Lowcountry Land Trust’s chief conservation officer. “We know in perpetuity the tree will remain a public space and be protected.”

Martin said that his mother would be thrilled to see the tree she loved so deeply be protected and enjoyed by the town.

“I think she would be very happy with it just for the fact that is it staying with the town,” Martin said. “Everybody is happy with the whole dealing of it. It worked out well for everybody. I’m very happy that it’ll be used with the town forever. That’ll never change.”

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