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roofer in Seabrook Island, SC

Have you ever taken a second to really think about how important your home's roof is to your health and safety? It's so much more than a simple hat for your house. It protects you from the elements like rain, sleet, snow, and wind. It helps keep you and your family warm in the winter and cool in the summer. Those harmful pests and critters you see roaming around your property? Your roof helps keep them away from your family, too.

When you take those points into account, it becomes clear that your home's roof is crucial for year-round well-being and comfort. So, when your roof is nearing the end of its life, or it needs maintenance or repairs, hiring a reliable roofer in Seabrook Island, SC is an investment you shouldn't pass up. For South Carolina homeowners and business owners, only the best and brightest roofing experts will do when it comes to their family's happiness and safety. That's why they call on Hometown Roofing to handle all their repair, replacement, and maintenance needs.

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The Hometown Roofing Difference

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Hometown Roofing has been the top choice for roofing services in South Carolina for years. As locals of the Lowcountry, we pride ourselves on being more than just a roofing company. We're your friends and neighbors. As a family-owned business, integrity, hard work, and personalized service are at the forefront of our values. We believe in providing our loyal customers with the highest quality work completed by experts in their respective fields. Why? Because that's the way we would want to be treated, too.

At the end of the day, we strive to treat our customers with respect, confidence, and understanding. Our goal isn't to rip you off or charge you an arm and a leg for our residential or commercial roofing services. As an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, our goal is to work hard and provide you with a long-lasting product that you will love for years to come. It's really that simple. When you choose Hometown Roofing, you can rest assured that you'll get the highest quality roofing services in South Carolina, such as:

  • Roof Repair in Seabrook Island, SC
  • Roof Replacement Services
  • Roof Maintenance Services
  • Emergency Roofing Services
  • Roof Inspection Services
  • Commercial Roofing Services
Roofer Seabrook Island, SC

The Hometown Roofing Process

Whether you're in need of a complete roof replacement in Seabrook Island, SC, or minor roof maintenance, our process starts with an in-depth consultation and ends with a smile on our face.

Consultation

Consultation

At the consultation stage, we have a meeting with the client to talk about their roofing needs and evaluate the property. Based on our expertise, we provide recommendations to ensure the best solution for the client's specific roof replacement, repair, or maintenance requirements.

Detailed Proposal

Detailed Proposal

In the detailed proposal stage, we create a comprehensive document that outlines the scope of work relating to your roofing project, the materials to be used, project timeline, and estimated costs. This provides the client with a clear understanding of the roofing project, enabling them to make informed decisions.

Project Installation

Project Installation

During the project installation phase, our team of licensed experts executes the previously agreed-upon plan. We install or repair the roofing system with unmatched confidence and experience while always adhering to industry standards, safety protocols, and local laws. During this process, we strive to stay in touch every step of the way so our clients are always in the loop. We then complete your roofing project within the specified timeline so that clients experience minimal disruptions to their daily lives.

Final Inspection

Final Inspection

When it's time for the final inspection of your roofing project, our roofing contractor's work is thoroughly examined to ensure it meets our high standards and our client's roofing needs. If there is additional work to be done, we'll finish up the project ASAP. If our client has questions or concerns, we always address them before heading home. That way, our customers can rest easy at night knowing they have a reliable, well-maintained roof over their heads.

Protect Your Home or Business with Roof Repair in Seabrook Island, SC

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Living in South Carolina means experiencing unpredictable weather patterns. Bright and sunny skies can quickly turn into heavy rainfall, which can cause damage to your roof. That's why it's important to have a reliable roofing company to perform expert repairs when needed.

Whether you suspect damage has been done to your roof or you want preventative maintenance, Hometown Roofing is here to handle the hard work for you. A thorough roof inspection is the first step in understanding your repair needs. Our team will then repair any damage, like weather-worn shingles or roof leaks, to ensure your family is safe and protected.

Some of the most common roof repairs we provide for homeowners and business owners include the following:

  • Torn or Damaged Shingle Repair and Replacement
  • Tile or Shingle Replacement
  • Roof Shrinkage Issues
  • Roofing Leaks
  • Ventilation Issues
  • Pooling or Standing Water
  • Storm Damage Repair
  • Damaged Gutter Repair
  • Roof Flashing Repair
  • Much More
 Roof Repair Seabrook Island, SC

Don't wait until it's too late to schedule repairs - your roof might only be one or two South Carolina storms away from needing more than simple maintenance or repairs! South Carolina homeowners and entrepreneurs trust Hometown Roofing for their roof repairs because we:

Prioritize Safety

We put a lot of stock in the ethos of "Safety first before everything." As licensed contractors with years of experience, our roofers have the tools and training to repair your roof without you needing to worry about their safety. Of course, your safety is of utmost importance, too. Hiring an experienced professional saves you from putting yourself and your family in a compromising situation that could involve hospitals, doctors, and injuries.

Because the truth is, roof repairs usually require climbing ladders, balancing on high roofs, and working under pressure. Those aren't things an average homeowner looks forward to. By working with Hometown Roofing, you're leaving the difficult work up to highly trained experts, so you can focus on your family, not recovering from an injury sustained from DIY roofing.

Have Extensive Roofing Experience

You can tell whether a roofer is worth hiring by asking them about their roofing experience. The very best roofers usually have years, if not decades, of professional experience. Those years working up on roofs out in the sun is priceless for homeowners and business owners who want the best roofing service. At Hometown Roofing, our contractors have extensive knowledge and experience, both in advanced applications and basic roof repair theory. Unlike some roofers, Hometown Roofing team members have real-world experience and certifications - something that no amount of reading or watching YouTube videos will provide.

Maintain Warranties on Roofing Products

As a homeowner or business owner, you want every assurance that your new roof or roofing products will last for the long haul. That's why we're proud to provide a 50-year manufacturer warranty and a 20-year labor warranty on all new asphalt architectural shingle roofs. We also provide a 20-year labor warranty on all new standing seam metal roofs and a 10-year labor warranty on new tuff-rib metal roofs.

Provide High-Quality Roofing Craftsmanship

Our team at Hometown Roofing is dedicated to delivering exceptional roof repairs and top-notch service. We take pride in our work and strive for excellence when repairing, replacing, or installing roofs in South Carolina. We understand that even the smallest details matter, which is why we thoroughly inspect our work to ensure the highest quality. Our main objective is to surpass your expectations with true roofing expertise, not just average service. For long-lasting roof repairs, trust the professionals at Hometown Roofing.

 Roof Replacement Seabrook Island, SC

Reliable Roof Replacement in Seabrook Island, SC

When it comes to getting a new roof for your home, you want to make sure it's done right. That's why you need licensed professionals to handle the complex and intensive process. It may seem like a big investment, but the long-term benefits are worth it. You'll enjoy increased safety, comfort, and a higher home value. At Hometown Roofing, we're the go-to company for roof installations in South Carolina.

Our experts have completed hundreds of successful projects, and we hold ourselves to the highest standards for product longevity, customer satisfaction, and quality craftsmanship. Whether you're looking to upgrade your roof or need a replacement due to damage, we've got you covered. We specialize in many types of roof replacement projects, including:

  • Asphalt Roofs - Cost Effective, Popular, Versatile, and Appealing
  • Metal Roofs - Long Lasting, Low Maintenance, Energy Efficient, Superior Protection
  • Commercial Flat Top and TPO Roofs - Durable, Energy Efficient, UV and Chemical Resistant, Purpose Built for Your Business

When Is It Time to Replace Your Roof?

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At Hometown Roofing, one of the most common questions we get is, "How do I know when it's time to replace my roof?" That's not always an easy question to answer since every roofing structure and every roof replacement scenario is slightly different. Roofs endure harsh weather conditions like extreme heat, strong winds, freezing temperatures, and heavy rainfall, which can damage their protective layers. Although some roofs can last up to 25 years, shingles and other materials may deteriorate over time and become brittle, crack, tear, or disintegrate. While it can be challenging to assess the condition of your roof from the ground, these signs may help you determine when it's time for roof replacement in Seabrook Island, SC.

Begin Looking Indoors

It might seem counterintuitive to look for signs of disrepair inside your home, but rooms like your attic can show signs of damage much better than outside areas. Be sure to grab a powerful flashlight first and look carefully for streaks, stains, and drips. Also, keep an eye out for light beams poking through the top of your house. If you see these signs, there's a good chance your roof has leaks and should be replaced.

Cupped, Clawed, or Curled Shingles

You'll need a good view of your roof to check for these red flags, which are telltale signs that your roof is near the end of its life. Curling and cupping look alike and manifest with the ends of your shingles peeling away and pointing up. Clawing happens when the middle of a shingle lifts up while its ends stay attached to the roof. None of these conditions are good, so if you spot them, know that it could be time for a roof inspection.

Age of Your Roof

How old is your roof? If it's more than 25 years old, chances are it's on its way out. The average lifespan of an asphalt roof is 20-25 years. When that time frame passes, you should consider looking at replacing your worn-out roof.

Friends in Your Neighborhood are Replacing Roofs

If you're driving around your neighborhood and notice one or more roofers in Seabrook Island, SC, make a mental note to inspect your roof. It's common for houses in neighborhoods to be constructed at the same time, with the same materials purchased in bulk by the builder. As a result, the roofs of these homes tend to deteriorate at a similar rate. With that in mind, if you observe your neighbors replacing their roofs, it may be a sign that you should consider doing the same.

Your Roof is Sagging

A sagging roof is a sign of structural problems and may require a new roof installation. This problem is typically caused by water damage or a broken rafter, and it's important to have a licensed and insured roofing company, like Hometown Roofing, address the issue. To properly diagnose the problem, the contractor may need to remove the shingles and plywood sheathing underneath.

Roofer Seabrook Island, SC
 Roof Repair Seabrook Island, SC

Emergency Roof Repair in Seabrook Island, SC

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Hometown Roofing is available to assist when disaster strikes. We recognize that roofing emergencies can occur at any time, so we provide 24/7 emergency roofing services to homeowners in our community. Here is an overview of the critical emergency services we offer:

Available 24/7
Available 24/7

When you're in a roofing emergency, Hometown Roofing is always here to help. Our expert team is available 24/7 to respond quickly and professionally to any crisis. We understand that your home's safety is your top priority, and we're committed to mitigating damage and providing peace of mind during difficult times.

Help with Insurance Claims
Help with Insurance Claims

Dealing with insurance claims can be overwhelming, especially after a disaster. That's why Hometown Roofing offers assistance navigating the complicated process of working with your insurance company. We'll help you document the damage and submit the necessary paperwork to your insurance provider, ensuring a smoother and more successful claim.

Emergency Roof Tarping
Emergency Roof Tarping

If your roof has suffered severe damage and can't be repaired immediately, our emergency tarping service can provide temporary protection from further harm. This solution will safeguard your home from the elements until repairs can be made. Trust Hometown Roofing to keep your home safe and secure in any roofing emergency.

Storm Damage Repair
Storm Damage Repair

When severe weather hits, your roof can take a beating. From losing shingles to damaging the structure, it can leave your home vulnerable. That's where Hometown Roofing comes in. We offer quick and reliable storm damage repair services to ensure your roof is safe and secure once again.

Stabilize Your Home's Structure
Stabilize Your Home's Structure

If your roof has been severely damaged by a fallen tree or other catastrophic event, call Hometown Roofing ASAP. Our team is here to help. We'll stabilize your roof, preventing any potential collapse or further damage, helping provide peace of mind and comfort in a trying time.

Remove Debris
Remove Debris

After a storm, your roof can be covered in debris that may cause additional damage if left unattended. Our experienced professionals are equipped to safely remove any debris, ultimately preserving the lifespan of your roof.

Temporary Roof Repair in Seabrook Island, SC
Temporary Roof Repair in Seabrook Island, SC

Sometimes, extensive repairs to your roof can't be completed immediately after an emergency. Our team of roofing experts can provide a temporary fix so that your home is safe, dry, and protected from more damage.

Repairs for Emergency Leaks
Repairs for Emergency Leaks

When your roof sprouts a leak suddenly, it can be catastrophic. Hometown Roofing professionals will locate the source of your leak and provide a quick, effective solution to your problem.

Emergency Roof Inspections
Emergency Roof Inspections

When a severe weather event or other emergency incident occurs, you may need a roof inspection to assess the totality of your damage. Hometown Roofing inspections identify needed repairs. That way, you plan for the next steps and do what's necessary to protect your roof and your family.

Hometown Roofing: South Carolina's Premier Choice for Quality Roofing Services

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Hometown Roofing was born out of a rich legacy and a steadfast commitment to quality. Unlike many roofing companies in South Carolina, we stand by the ethos of doing everything right and never cutting corners. We extend that commitment to your home, whether you need minor roof repairs, a total roof replacement, or something in between. Contact our office to schedule your initial consultation today.

 Roof Replacement Seabrook Island, SC

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132 E 2nd N St, Summerville, SC 29483

Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

Editorial: We dodged a bullet on Seabrook. Make sure it doesn't happen again.

Everyone who cares about southern Johns Island should be pleased that a controversial annexation was pulled from the Seabrook Island Town Council's agenda last week in the face of mounting opposition over what the annexation would help create — a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages — and the likelihood that it would add more traffic and pollution to the rural side of Charleston County's urban growth boundary.But those same folks, particularly leaders on Kiawah and Seabrook islands...

Everyone who cares about southern Johns Island should be pleased that a controversial annexation was pulled from the Seabrook Island Town Council's agenda last week in the face of mounting opposition over what the annexation would help create — a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages — and the likelihood that it would add more traffic and pollution to the rural side of Charleston County's urban growth boundary.

But those same folks, particularly leaders on Kiawah and Seabrook islands and Charleston County Council, should not get complacent. Instead, they need to work together on better planning to guide development in and around where those two sea islands meet up with southern Johns Island.

It's unclear when, or if, the developer's annexation request might resurface. Even if it doesn't, there undoubtedly will be other development plans that will expose the tensions between those living on rural Johns Island and those living beyond the gates at Kiawah and Seabrook. This moment offers an important reset, one that should begin with getting all these local governments to recommit to the vision of an urban growth boundary — a line past which suburban development would not be supported through zoning, infrastructure or other local policies.

Such a recommitment wouldn't bind future councils any more than their respective comprehensive plans do, but it would send a unified message about their mutual commitment to respect the natural beauty and environmental sensitivity of the area.

It's clear that development pressures at Kiawah's and Seabrook's doorstep are increasing. A fresh series of new developments, including a senior living facility and an emergency medical facility, is cropping up. Elected officials, neighborhood leaders and county planners need to come up with a mutually agreed-upon zoning overlay for the area, one that would guide future development to ensure new uses and the size and scale of new buildings are appropriate. Such an overlay also would prevent developers from trying to play one jurisdiction against another to get the permits they seek, a tactic sometimes used in other parts of the tri-county area.

The mutual interests of everyone became clear during this recent annexation controversy, as the mayor of Kiawah Island took the unusual step of sending a letter to Seabrook's mayor and council urging them to reject the annexation and respect the urban growth boundary, which Mayor John Labriola noted "serves as a guide to direct appropriate urban and suburban development while preserving and cherishing the rural charm of the Sea Islands that we all hold dear."

Given what we've seen this summer, the existing urban growth boundary line may not continue to be enough on its own, and we believe a joint planning effort could help pin down the following: to what extent commercial development in the greater Freshfields area should be allowed to inch its way north on Betsy Kerrison; whether the towns should annex any more of Johns Island; whether any upzoning in the area might be appropriate; and how new building would affect the net traffic and drainage needs around Kiawah and Seabrook. While residents live only on Kiawah or Seabrook or in the unincorporated area, they have a stake in the answers to all those questions. This area deserves a new zoning overlay and conservation goals that offer a shared vision of how the southern part of Johns Island will — and will not — change.

Regional planning needs to take place on a large scale — such as our greater metro area from Seabrook to Awendaw to Summerville and Moncks Corner — but it's also necessary on a smaller scale, especially in those places such as southern Johns Island where multiple local governmental jurisdictions meet.

Decades ago, the city of Charleston and Charleston County came up with the urban growth boundary across Johns Island and other areas where the suburbs ended to ensure their zoning and other policies worked together to protect rural areas that residents wanted to remain rural. Kiawah and Seabrook were once seen as too distant to bring into the conversation about that line. That's not the case any more.

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First-ever committee addresses Seabrook Island short-term rentals

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A first-time special committee on short-term rentals is hearing Seabrook Island residents’ concerns and hopes for the island’s future.The Seabrook Island Town Council established a Special Committee on Short-Term Rentals on Jan. 4 with the members being appointed on Jan. 23.The committee’s purpose is to study short-term rental activities and trends within the town. This could involve limiting the number of short-term rentals, limiting the ownership of multiple short-term rentals,...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A first-time special committee on short-term rentals is hearing Seabrook Island residents’ concerns and hopes for the island’s future.

The Seabrook Island Town Council established a Special Committee on Short-Term Rentals on Jan. 4 with the members being appointed on Jan. 23.

The committee’s purpose is to study short-term rental activities and trends within the town. This could involve limiting the number of short-term rentals, limiting the ownership of multiple short-term rentals, what fees are reasonable, etc.

Seabrook Island is home to 2,345 family homes and villas and 588 of those are short-term rentals, according to the town.

With about 25% of the island being taken up by short-term rentals, some residents say there are issues that need to be addressed.

“Agitating alligators,” Seabrook Island resident John Lagna said during Wednesday’s first public forum. “Secondly, speeding. Thirdly, ignoring stop signs... Lastly, ignoring amenity rules.”

However, not everyone agrees.

“There are a number of factors that have entered into it, but short-term rentals seem to be an easy target,” resident Debra Hardick said.

The committee says they are referencing data from peak COVID-19 times from when the number of renters significantly increased.

Resident Paul McLaughlin says the growth of the island has impacted the overall sense of community.

“If you don’t know who your neighbors are, it’s just not a very good feeling,” McLaughlin said.

The committee is made up of a town councilman, homeowners and even short-term rental owners who have been on the island for around a decade or more. They say the town has previously had an Ad Hoc Committee to address this topic, which was allowed to be done privately, but they want this one to be public to increase transparency.

Darryl May is the only town councilman on the short-term rental committee while the other seven are residents.

“So, the goal of this committee is to develop a set of proposals for the town council to pass an ordinance,” May said.

During the public forum, some shared ideas for what that ordinance may or may not look like.

“I think we should allow renters,” resident Ann Laporte said. “I think we should allow a minimum of three nights. No more than that.”

Resident Bill Boissonalt has another idea, adding that the town shouldn’t still be referencing data from peak COVID in 2020.

“I just don’t believe that we need any new regulations regarding the overnight stay, the capped rentals, based on history,” Boissonalt said.

As far as what the committee thinks the ordinance could look like, May says he doesn’t want to jump the gun.

“I won’t hazard to guess because we’re just starting out this process and we want to have a very open mind,” May said. “But we do anticipate getting an ordinance by about June.”

There are still three more public hearings over the next two weeks and the committee encourages Seabrook Island residents and those who rent on the island to speak.

Click here to read more about past short-term rental data and sign up for public comment.

Read below for the details on the next three public forums:

Public Forum #2

Public Forum #3

Public Forum #4

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Planned yacht club advances after Seabrook Island board OKs annexation, land use change

SEABROOK ISLAND — Three decades after a plan to create a 400-slip marina through a canal and lock project on Johns Island was rejected, a scaled-down proposal calls for a private yacht club on nearly 18 acres in the same general area on Bohicket Creek.Conservationists and several area ...

SEABROOK ISLAND — Three decades after a plan to create a 400-slip marina through a canal and lock project on Johns Island was rejected, a scaled-down proposal calls for a private yacht club on nearly 18 acres in the same general area on Bohicket Creek.

Conservationists and several area residents oppose the development called Andell, but Seabook Island's Planning Commission voted 4-1 on July 12 to recommend annexing the site and zoning the property for a mixed-used development. Town council will have final say.

Bohicket Creek Investors LLC of Charleston wants to build a boat dock with a private clubhouse, boathouse and poolhouse along with outdoor amenities and 10 rental cottages for members and the public at 4484 Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

"Annexing gives Seabrook future control of the site," said Mike Shuler, the property owner's principal and managing partner. "It will substantially limit future development of the site."

The property, currently zoned for agricultural and residential use in unincorporated Charleston County, would allow "a variety of agricultural and light industrial uses ... which could have significantly greater impact on the existing natural features than the proposed development," according to the town's planning staff, which recommended conditional project approval.

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Among those opposing the project is the Coastal Conservation League.

Robby Maynor, the Charleston-based environmental group's communities and transportation program director, said the project is outside the region's "urban growth boundary" and called the proposed development "a step in the opposite direction" of protecting rural acreage.

He also cited potentially adverse effects from pollution runoff into Bohicket Creek, increased boat traffic and encroachment into critical habitat areas.

A half dozen others cited similar concerns before the Planning Commission's vote. The board also noted it had received more than 500 comments about the proposal with the vast majority in opposition.

Proponents of the project said that the property's current zoning allows multiple uses than what's being proposed, that the town will have more control over the property if it is annexed and that the development will provide recreational opportunities.

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The project's name is similar to a proposed development from 30 years ago called Andell Harbor that called for a massive earth-moving operation with a man-made channel connecting to a large marina. State environmental regulators eventually nixed the idea in the mid-1990s.

The yacht club site is beside Bohicket Marina, which also is owned by Shuler's group, and the two would be connected by a boardwalk and road. The planned entrance to the new development is across from Kiawah Island Town Hall.

Cottages would flank both sides of the drive leading to the yacht club.

Plans show the development on about 4 acres of the site near the creek. The rest of the property would be set aside as open space, including a 75-foot wooded buffer next to the parkway and a 20-foot vegetated area next to the northwest parcel in the county.

The site also would include a public boardwalk, pathways and a community crabbing dock.

Bohicket Creek Investors bought the tract in 2021 for $5.6 million, according to Charleston County land records. Nearby properties include Freshfields Village Shopping Center.

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Bohicket Marina, which is in the town of Seabrook Island, is southwest of the proposed development.

If the property is annexed into the town, it would tie into the town's sewer system, with St. John's Water Co. proving water service

The yacht club would be separate from the community and recreational facilities provided by Seabrook Island Property Owners Association and Seabrook Island Club.

Town Council is scheduled to review the proposal on Aug. 22. The measure requires a public hearing and two majority votes in separate meetings to pass.

How Audubon South Carolina Protects Their Coastal Birds and the Places They Need

Maybe it’s seeing the first rays of sunlight peeking over the horizon while Sanderlings and Willets scamper on the sand sneaking bites to eat, or hearing the calls of Laughing Gulls overhead as Black Skimmers bark in the background—or the fact that I haven’t visited a beach in years—but sunrise at the beach is a magical experience.This morning, I’m in Charleston, South Carolina exploring Seabrook Island’s coast with my Audubon colleagues. We’re searching for migrating Red Knots, a shorebird th...

Maybe it’s seeing the first rays of sunlight peeking over the horizon while Sanderlings and Willets scamper on the sand sneaking bites to eat, or hearing the calls of Laughing Gulls overhead as Black Skimmers bark in the background—or the fact that I haven’t visited a beach in years—but sunrise at the beach is a magical experience.

This morning, I’m in Charleston, South Carolina exploring Seabrook Island’s coast with my Audubon colleagues. We’re searching for migrating Red Knots, a shorebird that stops over parts of the Atlantic Coast along its 9,000-mile journey to nest in the Arctic. (You can discover its full migration journey with the Bird Migration Explorer.)

Seabrook Island and its neighbor Kiawah Island are two key beaches that the species relies on for survival. Early May is horseshoe crab spawning season, which means the wet sand along islands nearby is filled with their eggs, and outside of spawning, Seabrook Island is rich with donax clams. Horseshoe crab eggs and donax clams are what sustain the knots as they prepare to fly the remainder of their journey to their breeding grounds.

"We get about 40% of the Red Knot Atlantic Coast population—that’s [over] 17,000 birds—that stop on Seabrook and Kiawah Islands in the springtime,” says Allyssa Zebrowski, Audubon South Carolina’s coastal stewardship coordinator.

Like Red Knots, endangered Piping Plovers use South Carolina beaches to rest and feed through the winter before making their way up north to breed. State-threatened Wilson’s Plovers raise their young here—so do state-threatened Least Terns—and 1/3 of the American Oystercatcher’s population find respite on these shores in the winter.

Human disturbance is one of the greatest threats these birds face along the nearly 3,000 miles of South Carolina’s tidal shorelines, whether that’s people walking through resting flocks or unleashed dogs getting too close to nesting birds. That’s why in 2016 Audubon South Carolina launched its Shorebird Stewardship program to conserve these five vulnerable focal species and other coastal birds by educating people about them.

“What started as a seasonal program led into a year-round need for stewardship,” says Nolan Schillerstrom, Audubon South Carolina’s coastal program associate. “We realized…that it really needed a year-round effort, not only to focus on the non-breeding birds but to continue the momentum from year to year.”

Now, depending on the year, Audubon South Carolina sends volunteers called Shorebird Stewards to 10 to 13 different coastal sites to prevent human disturbance. The stewards undergo training each year to learn more about coastal birds and their behaviors. They also are trained on how to talk to beachgoers to get them to care about the birds. Plus, they help post signs alerting people to birds nesting or resting nearby.

“It’s all about getting out there, watching out for the birds, and telling other people to [be mindful of] the birds,” says Zebrowski.

The Shorebird Stewardship program works with a variety of partners to reduce human disturbance, including Seabrook Island Birders, which runs the volunteer program at their beach site.

We’re joined by a couple of the birders today on our walk to find the Red Knots. Many of the beachgoers they encounter are their neighbors and visitors to the private island, so they have their own way of telling people to look out for the birds.

“I like to tell people a story about the birds to make them feel sympathetic towards them,” says Lesley Gore, one of the program coordinators. “I’ll tell them how many miles the Red Knots are going to fly and that it’s very important for them to gain their weight [undisturbed].”

It’s clear that stewardship plays a vital role in protecting beach birds across the country. A recent study led by Audubon’s science team found that four vulnerable coastal bird species’ populations grew 2 to 34 times faster at stewardship sites rather than birds in only protected areas.

Audubon South Carolina is already seeing positive results from the program. “We do see the improved nesting success of the American Oystercatcher, the Wilson’s Plover, and the Least Tern [at sites we help manage],” says Zebrowski. That nesting success is combined with the program’s growing number of volunteers and increased notoriety each year.

And it’s a good thing too, because shorebirds as a whole are at risk in North America. In fact, the continent’s shorebirds have declined by 70% since the 1970s.

“That’s the stat that we always think of when we’re on the ground,” says Schillerstrom. “We want to tern that around and give these birds a fighting chance here on the beach.”

After passing breeding American Oystercatcher pairs, diving Brown Pelicans, and soaring Osprey, we finally reach an inlet that gives us a view of the Red Knots, though they’re on Kiawah Island today. We watch them huddle en masse on the shoreline, preening and calling.

To be able to capture photos and footage, from a safe distance, we visit Kiawah Island the next day and make another trek in hopes of catching the knots at the right time. At first, we find them across the inlet on Seabrook Island, but suddenly, when the tide rises to the perfect height, the birds flock to the sky, flying back and forth over the water uniformly as they murmurate, creating mesmerizing patterns with their striking orange bellies and mottled gray backs.

They land on our side of the inlet, on Kiawah, and begin running along the shoreline, giving us the perfect opportunity to capture their essence. I watch their activity in awe, knowing that in just a few weeks, they will be making the last leg of their journey up north to breed. It reminds me of why we must all do our part to protect them so that they can exist for future generations.

I’m also reminded of a conversation we had with a shorebird steward volunteer, Nancy Chomel, who we met the day before at Seabrook Island. When asked what makes her passionate about protecting coastal birds, she replies, “In saving the birds, we save ourselves.”

Isn’t that what it’s all about?

To learn more about Audubon South Carolina’s coastal conservation efforts, including how to become a volunteer Shorebird Steward, visit their website.

Explore Charleston's Picturesque Barrier Islands On This Epic Multi-Day Road Trip

Everyone loves Charleston. It’s like the crown jewel of South Carolina, having been voted for 10 straight years by Travel + Leisure readers as the #1 city to visit in the United States and the only one in America included in the top 25 best cities in the world. That’s quite the recognition in the travel industry! And those who have been to Charleston certainly understand its allure. From beautiful sights to delicious restaurants to historical charm and southern hospitality, what’s not to love? Not to mention, there are alwa...

Everyone loves Charleston. It’s like the crown jewel of South Carolina, having been voted for 10 straight years by Travel + Leisure readers as the #1 city to visit in the United States and the only one in America included in the top 25 best cities in the world. That’s quite the recognition in the travel industry! And those who have been to Charleston certainly understand its allure. From beautiful sights to delicious restaurants to historical charm and southern hospitality, what’s not to love? Not to mention, there are always so many fun things to do in Charleston and its surrounding area. We’ve got a fabulous road trip for you to take that will get you a little farther out from downtown when you’re ready to branch out and explore more beyond, specifically, the stunning barrier islands of Charleston.

The Under-The-Radar Scenic Drive In South Carolina That Showcases Waterfalls, Creeks, And Orchards

The Stunning South Carolina Drive That Is One Of The Best Road Trips You Can Take In America

This Scenic Drive Runs Straight Through South Carolina's Hunting Island State Park, And It's A Breathtaking Journey

We only included the inhabited islands in our trip. Morris Island is a sixth barrier island of Charleston that’s uninhabited.

If you’d like to stay on each of the islands overnight, be sure to check on whether or not any of the places you’re looking at have a minimum number of nights required. That may be the case especially if your trip is during peak travel seasons, in such case, you may have to choose one location as your base to explore from.

Have you been to any of Charleston’s barrier islands? Which is your favorite if you’ve been to more than one, and why?

If you’re looking for other fun things to do in Charleston, check out the nighttime award-winning tour where you can see some of the city’s incredible sites while learning some fascinating things about the history of this popular locale!

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